Tag Archives: James Hong

Video- BACKSTAGE PASS with Lia Chang – An Academy Museum Tribute to Big Trouble in Little China’s James Hong w/ Arthur Dong, Dennis Dun, Peter Kwong

Updated: 

The eleventh episode of BACKSTAGE PASS with Lia Chang, executive produced and hosted by Lia, aired on November 20 at 6:30 pm (EST) on FIOS 34, RCN 83, and Spectrum 56/1996. If you missed the episode, it is archived on the BACKSTAGE PASS with Lia Chang youtube channel or click below.

 

Lia Chang attends the screening of BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures and special tribute to James Hong on November 5, 2022.  Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation

On this edition of BACKSTAGE PASS with Lia Chang, you’ll meet prolific Oscar®-nominated filmmaker Arthur Dong who has curated a terrific film series presented by The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Hollywood Chinese: The First 100 Years.

Lia Chang and Arthur Dong at the reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Tami Chang

On the opening weekend of the series, I flew to LA for to celebrate the 15th anniversary since the release of Arthur Dong’s Hollywood Chinese documentary and finally got my signed copy of Arthur’s book, Hollywood  Chinese:The Chinese in American Feature Films. You can get your copy here.

Arthur Dong and Lia Chang at the reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Tami Chang

Here’s a recap of my 24 hours in LA. 
Nov. 4 at 3:30 p.m. A late lunch at Petit Trois, Ludo Lefebvre’s L.A. Bistro with Jeanne Sakata and her husband, Timothy Patterson.

Petit Trois

We noshed on the heartiest French Onion Soup I’ve ever had made with veal broth, gruyère and emmental cheeses, carmelized onions and croutons, and a Belgian Endive Salad (walnut, avocado, anchovy, formaggio di fossa, lemon zest, sherry vinaigrette).

Lia Chang, Timothy Patterson and Jeanne Sakata at Petit Trois.

6:00pm Ted Mann Theater at Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, 6067 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Lia Chang
Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Lia Chang

My first visit to the Academy Museum began with a opening night reception for the film series Hollywood Chinese: The First 100 Years, followed by a screening of Hollywood Chinese (2007) and a post-screening conversation with the film’s director and series guest programmer Arthur Dong, moderated by Academy Museum Director and President Jacqueline Stewart.

Lia Chang at the reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation

Opening night reception of Hollywood Chinese at the Academy Museum on November 4, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Jacqueline Stewart, Arthur Dong at the opening night reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” on Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Lia Chang
Jacqueline Stewart, Ross Lipman, Arthur Dong, Lia Chang at the opening night reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” on Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Tami Chang
Tami Chang, Buck Gee, Arthur Dong, Lia Chang, Young Gee, Jean Rosenblatt Sem Gee, Zand Gee at the reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” on Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Todd Weiner, Lia Chang, Stephen Westerhout at the Opening night reception of Hollywood Chinese @ the Academy Museum on November 4, 2022. Photo by Tami Chang
Lia Chang photographing the Gee Family at the reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Director and President Jacqueline Stewart and Arthur Dong, at the reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Lia Chang
Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Director and President Jacqueline Stewart and Arthur Dong, at the reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Lia Chang
Arthur Dong at the reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Director and President Jacqueline Stewart and Arthur Dong, at the reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Lia Chang at the reception and screening of “Hollywood Chinese” Nov. 4, 2022, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation

Hollywood Chinese: The First 100 Years showcases films that both critique and celebrate Hollywood’s depictions of the Chinese, as well as spotlight groundbreaking Chinese and Chinese American artists who have navigated an industry often ignorant of race.

Lia Chang and Tami Chang. Photo by Zand Gee

Nov. 5 – The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures

2:00pm – I watched a double bill of Anna May Wong in Daughter of the Dragon and King of Chinatown, featuring a primer by Arthur and an introduction by Anna May Wong’s niece, with my sister, Tami Chang.

4:00 pm –  I had a few hours to explore the museum, which I will feature in an upcoming article.

Lia Chang and Donna Noguchi in John Carpenter’s BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA (1986).
Lia Chang and Donna Noguchi in John Carpenter’s BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA (1986).

7:00 pm -I played a Wing Kong guard in John Carpenter’s cult classic, Big Trouble in Little China, which was featured on a double bill along with Black Widow at the Academy Museum as part of the opening weekend of Hollywood Chinese: The First 100 Years film series.

Bernardo Rondeau, Academy Museum Senior Director of Film Programs. James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Arthur Dong, Guest Programmer. James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation

The evening was a special tribute to James Hong, who plays Lo Pan in the film. Arthur presented a deep dive into Hong’s 68 year career.

Arthur Dong, Guest Programmer. James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation

The Q & A that followed included Arthur moderating a panel with Big Trouble in Little China cast members James Hong, Dennis Dun (Wang Chi) and Peter Kwong (Rain).

A Lo Pan replica made a surprise visit at the James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
A Lo Pan replica made a surprise visit at the James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Pictured: Lo Pan, James Hong and Peter Kwong. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
A Lo Pan replica made a surprise visit at the James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
James Hong is feted at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022.  Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
James Hong. A James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
James Hong. A James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
James Hong focus at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series HOLLWYOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS. The tribute included screenings of “Big Trouble in Little China” and “Black Widow” on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Panelist Peter Kwong, Dennis Dun, James Hong & Arthur Dong. James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Dennis Dun speaks during the James Hong focus at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Panelist Peter Kwong, Dennis Dun, James Hong  with guest programmer Arthur Dong at  James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Panelist Peter Kwong, Dennis Dun, James Hong  with guest programmer Arthur Dong at  James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Panelist Peter Kwong, Dennis Dun, James Hong  with guest programmer Arthur Dong at  James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
“Big Trouble in Little China” cast member Peter Kwong speaks at the James Hong focus at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Panelists Peter Kwong, Dennis Dun, James Hong & guest programmer Arthur Dong at James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022.  Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation

It was wonderful to have an opportunity to reconnect with my castmates James Hong, Dennis Dun, Peter Kwong and Gerald Okamura after the Q & A.

Lo Pan, Irene Tsu, Joycelyne Lew, Peter Kwong, Rhonda Wong, James Hong, Dennis Dun, Lia Chang, Gerald Okamura, Arthur Dong. Photo: Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Peter Kwong, Lia Chang, Arthur Dong attend the James Hong focus at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series HOLLYWOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
Gerald Okamura, Lia Chang, Peter Kwong. Photo by Tami Chang
Lia Chang, Stephen Westerhout, Todd Weiner. Photo by Tami Chang
“Big Trouble in Little China” cast member Gerald Okamura attends the James Hong focus at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
“Big Trouble in Little China” cast members Gerald Okamura and Peter Kwong attend James Hong focus at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series HOLLYWOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS. on  November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation
“Big Trouble in Little China” cast members Geraldo Okamura, Lia Chang, and Peter Kwong attend the James Hong tribute at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures series, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: THE FIRST 100 YEARS on November 5, 2022. Photo by Michael Owen Baker © Academy Museum Foundation

Click here for tickets and more information on the film series.

Special thanks to my sister, Tami Chang who got me back to LAX to catch my redeye back to New York.

Lia Chang and Tami Chang. Photo by Zand Gee

Check out the full lineup below and the remaining screenings.

• Nov. 20, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Sand Pebbles
• Nov. 25, 2022 | 7:30 pm | Flower Drum Song –In person: Nancy Kwang, Irene Tsu
• Nov. 26, 2022 | 3 pm | Our Gang: Baby Blues with Charlie Chan in Honolulu – In person: Margie Chun Moon, original Charle Chan kid
• Nov. 26, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Joy Luck Club -Special guests TBA
• Nov. 27, 2022 | 2 pm | The Arch with Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl – In person: Joan Chen
• Nov. 27, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Last Emperor – In person: Joan Chen

TICKETS Tickets to the Academy Museum are available only through advance online reservations via the Academy Museum’s website and mobile app.

Film screening tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors (age 62+), and $5 for students and children (age 17-). Matinees are $5 for all. Ticket prices for Academy Museum members are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors, and $4 for students, children, and matinee-goers. Use promo code VC2022 for $2 off every ticket.

TOP: Joan Chen, James Hong, Nancy Kwan, Ang Lee, Christopher Lee.
MIDDLE: Luise Rainer, James Shigeta, Amy Tan, B.D. Wong, Wayne Wang.
BOTTOM: Tsai Chin, David Henry Hwang, Lisa Lu, Justin Lin, Turhan Bey.

SCREENING DETAILS

Nov. 4, 2022 | 7: 30 pm |
Hollywood Chinese: With a treasure trove of clips from over 90 films, Hollywood Chinese traces the American film industry’s representation of the Chinese during its first 100 years. Scenes ranging from the first feature film made by Chinese Americans in 1917 to breakout Oscar wins are interwoven with interviews of Chinese and Chinese American artists who reveal stories of working in Hollywood. White actors, such as Luise Rainer and Christopher Lee, recall their yellowface performances to explain the now-controversial practice. Hollywood Chinese, produced and directed by series Guest Programmer Arthur Dong, is a fitting roadmap to embark on the upcoming film series.

Nov. 5, 2022 | 2 pm |
Daughter of the Dragon: After Anna May Wong’s breakthrough romantic role in The Toll of the Sea (1922), Hollywood relegated her
to mostly stereotypical villainous parts, including the sadistic daughter of the evil Fu Manchu in Daughter of the Dragon. Wong stars opposite silent film idol Sessue Hayakawa, both in their first sound film, with both speaking standard English at a time before Hollywood latched on to the common practice of directing Asian characters to deliver dialogue in overblown, accented broken English.

King of Chinatown: Under contract with Paramount, Anna May Wong embarked on a series of films upon which she exercised more input, starting with Daughter of Shanghai (1938), about which Wong declared, “We have the sympathetic parts for a change.” King of Chinatown casts Wong as a prominent Chinese American doctor
raising funds for the Red Cross in war-torn China, inspired by the real-life Chinese American physician Dr. Margaret Chung. This fictionalized crime drama features Korean American actor Philip Ahn as Wong’s romantic interest, playing a lawyer out to expose corruption in the underbelly of Chinatown.


Nov. 5, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Big Trouble in Little China: James Hong gives a show stopping performance as sorcerer Lo Pan in this cult favorite. Directed by horror-meister John Carpenter, Big Trouble in Little China takes a supernatural spin on Hollywood’s Chinatown tropes, populating the neighborhood with mystical beings Kurt Russell plays an antihero, but he’s not the typical white savior—he’s an outsider who’s clueless without his Chinese American friend Wang Chi, portrayed with modest aplomb by Dennis Dun Veteran actor Victor Wong offers crusty comic relief as a sorcerer-cum-tour bus driver. Special guests: James Hong, Dennis Dun and Peter Kwong in conversation following the Big Trouble in Little China screening.

Black Widow: With over 500 acting credits to his name, including scene-stealing performances in Chinatown (1974), Blade Runner (1982), and Kung Fu Panda (2008), James Hong counts Black Widow as one of his favorites. In this crime drama centered on the case of a murderess, Hong first appears mid-point a sa drug addicted investigator. For the role, the actor drew upon his improvisation training and bi-cultural background: “I just say the lines that are in my head, and of course what’s in my head is cussing out in Chinese to Debra Winger—all patterned after all those Chinese people who came to my dad’s herb store in Minnesota.”

Nov. 6, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Lost Horizon: This Frank Capra-directed classic is emblematic of how Hollywood constructed paradise—by way of China. The Oscarwinning art direction presents an opulent Shangri-La, yet the story is predicated on the subjugation of the Chinese by white saviors and colonialist, missionary ideals. The National Film Registry considered the film differently, however, when in 2016 it honored the film as “an emotional respite to an American public seeking escape from the Depression and yearning for their own personal utopias.” Lost Horizon received seven Oscar nominations, including Best Picture, and produced wins for Film Editing (Stephen Goosson) and Art Direction (Gene Havlick, Gene Milford).

Nov. 11, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Walk Like a Dragon: James Shigeta was a Japanese American singer whom Hollywood studios recruited to shape into a leading man— even casting him opposite white lovers. In the western Walk Like a Dragon, Shigeta portrays a Chinese immigrant who defies racism in 1870s California, winning a shoot-out against Mel Tormé and winning the girl, a formerly enslaved Chinese woman (Nobu McCarthy) who was previously saved by Jack Lord’s character Linc Bartlett. Lead roles for Shigeta diminished after Flower Drum Song (1961) as theHollywood studio system faded—but that didn’t stop Shigeta from working, including as the iconic Joseph Takagi in Die Hard (1988).

Pre-screening conversation with Nancy Kwan where she will discuss working with James Shigeta and Bruce Lee.

Enter the Dragon: Martial arts films were popular with Chinese audiences since the 1920s but it took Bruce Lee’s star power for the genre to catch fire worldwide. Born in San Francisco, Lee ignited his movie career in Hong Kong, experienced a frustrating career in the United States, and returned to Hong Kong where he directed and starred in hit films that caught the attention of Warner Bros. This all culminated with Lee’s seminal blockbuster, Enter the Dragon. “For Asian Americans, Bruce Lee wasn’t just exciting and cool. He was somebody who very deeply moved us, because he was us.”—Nancy Wang Yuen, media scholar

Nov. 12, 2022 | 2 pm |
Six Early Films, 1900-1929: For much of the history of Hollywood filmmaking, movies often portrayed Chinese as the “other” in a “them vs. us” hierarchy. Early movies, in particular, exploited this dichotomy, illustrated by the now-absurd—but no less damning—examples in this program. Yet, this era also saw productions from pioneering- Chinese American filmmakers who aspired to elevate onscreen representations of themselves. The films are as follows: Massacre of the Christians by the Chinese, The Heathen Chinese and the Sunday School Teachers, That Chink at Golden Gulch, The Curse of Quon Gwon, Lotus Blossom, and The Letter.

Special guests: Family members of filmmaker James B. Leong will join us for a post-screening conversation.

Nov. 12, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
The Tong-Man: Japan-born silent screen idol Sessue Hayakawa produced and starred as the titular Tong-Man. Ostensibly a love story set in San Francisco Chinatown, the film’s infusion of lurid hatchet murders and opium tong wars sparked the first legal action known to be filed by the Chinese American community against Hollywood’s depiction of the Chinese. The effort failed, and instead created free publicity and soaring box office receipts. Ironically, the film was supposed to be Hayakawa’s path away from racialized Hollywood typecasting.

Year of the Dragon: With a screenplay co-written by Oliver Stone and director Michael Cimino, this violent vision of 1980s New York Chinatown gang wars triggered nationwide protests by the Asian American community for its racist and sexist portrayals. Bowing to pressure, distributors added a disclaimer denying any intent to denigrate Asian Americans. No yellowfaced white actors were used, but Asian American cast members were caught in a controversial crossfire. The film, ultimately, was a box office flop.

Nov. 13, 2022 | 7:30pm |
7 Faces of Dr. Lao: Tony Randall portrays multiple identities in George Pal’s fantasy set in 1800s Arizona. The title character, Dr. Lao, features Randall in yellowface as he cunningly switches between broken and codespeak English to challenge corruption and intolerant attitudes. Artist and sculptor Wah Ming Chang served on the team that created the film’s Oscar-nominated special visual effects (Jim Danforth received the nomination for this achievement). Chang was also on the team responsible for the Oscar-winning visual effects in The Time Machine (1960). An honorary Oscar was awarded to William Tuttle for his makeup work on 7 Faces of Dr. Lao, yellowface included.Nov. 18 | 7:30 pm |

M. Butterfly: A cross-dressing Peking opera performer-cum-spyand a delusional French diplomat are unlikely lovers in David Henry Hwang’s explosive re-visioning of East/West sexual dynamics in M. Butterfly.  Based on Hwang’s Tony Award-winning play set during China’s Cultural Revolution, John Lone and Jeremy Irons portray two men who convolute Western ideals of femininity and masculinity, where the East is submissive and the West is dominant, and where Asian men are feminized and more desirable as female than as male. David Cronenberg directed this richly designed production, which was inspired by a true story.

The Wedding Banquet: Before Ang Lee directed his heartrending examination ofrepressed homosexuality in the Oscar-winning Brokeback Mountain (2005), he directed The Wedding Banquet, a playful comedy of manners involving a gay Chinese American New Yorker and his white boyfriend who fake a heterosexual
marriage to quell nagging parents. The scheme sets the stage for lighthearted explorations of family, self-identity, cultural values, and sexual politics. The US/Taiwan co-production earned an Academy Award nomination for Best International Feature Film, propelling Lee’s career worldwide.

Nov. 20, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
The Sand Pebbles: Robert Wise’s follow-up to The Sound of Music (1965) netted eight Oscar nominations, including a Best Supporting Actor mention for Mako’s endearing portrait of a Chinese coolie. Hong Kong and Taiwan provide the locations for this widescreen spectacle—an exotic 1920s China in revolutionary turmoil, where Chinese women are prostitutes and Chinese men are ruthless, where colonialism and missionaries are the norms, and the leading man is always a white savior. The Sand Pebbles kickstarted Mako’s distinguished career in film, stage, and television, and as co-founder of the nation’s leading Asian American theater group, the East West Players, in Los Angeles. Fellow founders James Hong and Beulah Quo also appear in The Sand Pebbles.

Nov. 25, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Flower Drum Song: Flower Drum Song represents a Hollywood milestone for Chinese American representation with its all-dancing, allsinging, and almost all-Asian cast, headlined by James Shigeta, Oscar-winner Miyoshi Umeki, Jack Soo, Benson Fong, Patrick Adiarte, and Nancy Kwan in her follow-up to The World of Suzie Wong (1960); Juanita Hall reprised her yellowfaced Broadway portrayal of Madame Liang. This lavish romantic comedy gave many Americans their first look at Chinatown beyond tourist facades and was later inducted into the National Film Registry for its stories of immigration and cultural assimilation. The musical, with joyful tunes by Rodgers and Hammerstein, earned five Oscar nominations for art direction, cinematography, and costumes, as well as its music scoring, and sound. Hermes Pan choreographed the lively routines.

Special guest: Post-screening conversation with actress Nancy Kwan

Nov. 26, 2022 | 3 pm | 
Our Gang: Baby Blues: “Every 4th child is born Chinese.” This questionable Almanac factoid ignites Our Gang member Mickey’s fears that his unborn sibling will end up being Chinese. What’s he afraid of? Perhaps he’ll learn something from Eddie and Jennifer Lee, two veteran Hollywood movie extras who portray the parents of a boy rescued from racist bullies by the kids in Our Gang. The Lees’ real-life daughters, Faye and Margie, appeared as Charlie Chan’s kids in Charlie Chan in Honolulu (1939). Anti-Asian violence, racial slurs, Confucianism, and white saviorism: it’s all packed into this ten-minute short that, in the end, is a call for tolerance.

Charlie Chan in Honolulu: Just one of over forty films in the popular Charlie Chan detective franchise, Charlie Chan in Honolulu emphasizes family, with the plot bookended by the birth of a grandchild. A raucous family meal with Chan’s kids opens the film, pushing the patriarch to command, “Save football tactics for gridiron!” Audience members who cringe at the sight of yellowfaced white actors might want to wear blinders and earplugs when Sidney Toler appears as Chan, replete with slanted eyes and dubious aphorisms, in order to enjoy some spirited scenes with Victor Sen Yung and Layne Tom Jr. as his all-American sons.

Nov. 26, 2022 | 7:30 pm |

The Joy Luck Club: In the history of Hollywood studio films, only a handful have centered on contemporary Chinese American characters and cast with mostly Asian actors: Flower Drum Song (1961), The Joy Luck Club (1993), Crazy Rich Asians (2018), The Farewell (2019), and Everything Everywhere All at Once (2022). Based on Amy Tan’s novel about mother/daughter relationships, The Joy Luck Club was guided by Tan as co-producer and co-writer and Janet Yang as executive producer, with auteur Wayne Wang directing what became his pivot into main-stream studio filmmaking. Hiring white performers in yellowface was off-limits, and the film boasts an ensemble cast of trailblazing Asian American actors from two generations: veteran actresses Tsai Chin, Kieu Chinh, Lisa Lu, and France Nuyen portrayed the mothers, while Rosalind Chao, Tamlyn Tomita, Lauren Tom, and Ming-Na Wen played the daughters.

Nov. 27, 2022 | 2 pm |
The Arch: Lisa Lu’s first Hollywood role was as a bar girl in China Doll (1958). Frustrated with typecasting, Lu travelled to Hong Kong for The Arch, portraying a woman in 1700s China confined by rules of chastity. The film was made by one of Hong Kong’s earliest female directors, Tang Shu Shuen, and considered the region’s first art film to reach international audiences. Mixing naturalism with techniques like freeze frames and double exposures, the black-and white film was co-edited by Les Blank and co-photographed by Satyajit Ray’s frequent cinematographer Subrata Mitra. The Arch launched Lu’s distinguished acting career in Asia, which then thrived transnationally in America (The Last Emperor, The Joy Luck Club, Crazy Rich Asians).

Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl: After her breakthrough appearance in Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Last Emperor (1987), Joan Chen was offered parts that mainly exploited her ethnic allure. She recalled, “If I didn’t leave Hollywood, I would have never directed Xiu Xiu”—and leave she did to direct and co-write Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl. The independently produced film centered on a young girl relocated to the countryside during China’s Cultural Revolution. Exquisitely shot on location in Tibet, Xiu Xiu won seven Golden Horse Awards, including director and writer nods for Chen.

Special guest: Post-screening conversation with writer/director Joan Chen.

Nov. 27, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
The Last Emperor: In 2015, #OscarsSoWhite went viral and fueled a movement that exposed the decades-long scarcity of Academy Award nominations for people of color in acting categories. In the Oscars’ 94-year history, only three Best Picture winners featured mostly Asian casts, and none of these received any acting nominations: Parasite (2019), Slumdog Millionaire (2008), and The Last Emperor, which won nine of nine nominations. This presentation of The Last Emperor not only celebrates the breathtaking imagination of director Bernardo Bertolucci’s epic vison of China, but also gives audiences a chance to reconsider the Academy’s omission of honors for its brilliant cast.

Special guest: Post-screening conversation with writer/director Joan Chen.

General admission tickets for the museum’s exhibitions are $25 for adults, $19 for seniors (age 62+), and $15 for students. Admission for visitors ages 17 and younger, and for California residents with an EBT card is free.

COVID PROTOCOL
Visitors are required to follow all current COVID-19 public health guidelines by the state of California and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health in place at the time of their visit.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY MUSEUM
The Academy Museum is the largest institution in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Academy Museum Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries will be open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

Academy Museum film programming supported by the Richard Roth Foundation.

Academy Museum film programming generously funded by the Richard Roth Foundation. Donors to the Academy Museum’s fund in support of Asian American Pacific Islander programming include Esther S. M. Chui-Chao, Julia and Ken Gouw, and Dr. Peter Lam Kin Ngok of Media Asia Group Holdings Limited.

Lia Chang

Lia Chang is an actor, a multi-media content producer, an award-winning filmmaker, and a photo activist and documentarian, who lifts up and amplifies BIPOC communities and artists and the institutions that support them. Bev’s Girl Films collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers, musicians and corporations. Lia is the co-founder of Bev’s Girl Films, making films that foster inclusion and diversity on both sides of the camera. Lia is also the host and Executive Producer of BACKSTAGE PASS WITH LIA CHANG, a new Arts and Entertainment program that airs on Sundays at 6:30pm on FIOS 34, RCN 83, Spectrum 56/1996.

Bev’s Girl Films’ debut short film, Hide and Seek was a top ten film in the Asian American Film Lab’s 2015 72 Hour Shootout Filmmaking Competition, and she received a Best Actress nomination. Her short film, When the World Was Young recently garnered a 2021 DisOrient Film Audience Choice Award for Best Short Narrative. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman. She stars in and served as Executive Producer for the short independent films Hide and Seek, Balancing Act, Rom-Com Gone Wrong, Belongingness and When the World was Young. She is also the Executive Producer for The Cactus, The Language Lesson, The Writer and Cream and 2 Shugahs. BGF collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers, musicians and corporations.

All text, graphics, articles & photographs: © 2000-2022 Lia Chang Multimedia. All rights reserved. All materials contained on this site are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of Lia Chang, unless otherwise indicated. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content. For permission, please contact Lia at backstagepasswithliachang@gmail.com.

Video: BACKSTAGE PASS with Lia Chang – Asian American Artists Taking Center Stage in New York and Beyond

Lia Chang, co-founder of Bev’s Girl Films, has launched her latest venture, BACKSTAGE PASS with Lia Chang, an Arts and Entertainment program produced weekly at the studios of MNN.org.

Arthur Dong and Lia Chang at the opening reception of HOLLYWOOD CHINESE: The First 100 Years at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in LA on Nov. 4, 2022. Photo by Tami Chang

Lia Chang is an actor, a multi-media content producer, an award-winning filmmaker, and a photo activist and documentarian, who lifts up and amplifies BIPOC communities and artists and the institutions that support them. Bev’s Girl Films collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers, musicians and corporations.

The tenth episode of BACKSTAGE PASS with Lia Chang, executive produced and hosted by Lia, aired on November 13 at 6:30 pm (EST) on FIOS 34, RCN 83, and Spectrum 56/1996. If you miss the episode, it is archived on my youtube channel.

Watch below:

On this edition of BACKSTAGE PASS with Lia Chang, I’ll be shining the spotlight on my Asian American colleagues taking centerstage.

Oscar®-nominated filmmaker Arthur Dong has curated a terrific film series presented by The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Hollywood Chinese: The First 100 Years. Screenings of all 27 films in the series take place at the museum’s state of the art Ted Mann Theater in Los Angeles through Nov. 27.

The film series both critiques and celebrates Hollywood’s depictions of the Chinese, and presents groundbreaking Chinese American artists who navigated industry challenges from the beginning of film history to now.

On the opening weekend, I flew to LA to celebrate the 15th anniversary since the release of Arthur Dong’s Hollywood Chinese documentary, and it was screened as the kick-off of the 27-film series.

TOP: Joan Chen, James Hong, Nancy Kwan, Ang Lee, Christopher Lee.
MIDDLE: Luise Rainer, James Shigeta, Amy Tan, B.D. Wong, Wayne Wang.
BOTTOM: Tsai Chin, David Henry Hwang, Lisa Lu, Justin Lin, Turhan Bey.

I watched a double bill of Anna May Wong in Daughter of the Dragon and King of Chinatown and then reconnected with my Big Trouble in Little China cast mates James Hong, Peter Kwong, Dennis Dun and Gerald Okamura at a screening of the film, followed by Q & A.

Irene Tsu, Joycelyne Lew, Peter Kwong, Rhonda Wong, James Hong, Dennis Dun, Lia Chang, Gerald Okamura, Arthur Dong. Photo by Tami Chang

Click here for tickets and more information on the film series.

Click here to purchase Hollywood  Chinese:The Chinese in American Feature Films.

Saturday evening served as a tribute to James Hong, which you can watch on my episode airing on Nov. 20.

Featured on the show:

Patrick Chen’s award winning short film, A Father’s Son, starring Tzi Ma, Ronny Chieng, Perry Yung and Kathleen Kwan.

Henry Chang, Wing Lee, Ronny Chieng, Patrick Chen and Lia Chang attend the New York Shorts International Film Festival at Cinema Village in New York on Oct. 26, 2022.
Henry Chang, Wing Lee, Ronny Chieng, Patrick Chen and Lia Chang attend the New York Shorts International Film Festival at Cinema Village in New York on Oct. 26, 2022.

Director Patrick Chen Receives 2022 NYSIFF Special Mention and 2022 QWFF Best Director for a Narrative Short Nomination; Queens World Film Festival will Screen A FATHER’S SON at MOMI on Nov. 4

Yilong Liu’s Good Enemy at Minetta Lane Theatre – through Nov. 27

Ryan Spahn, Ron Domingo, Chay Yew, Francis Jue, Yilong Liu, Geena Quintos, Jeena Yi, Tim Liu, Alec Silver, Emilia LaPenta – Producer of New Play Development and Commissions for Audible Theater. Photo by Lia Chang

Audible, Inc.’s production of Yilong Liu’s Good Enemy, directed by Chay Yew and featuring Francis Jue, Ron Domingo, Tim Liu, Geena Quintos, Alec Silver, Ryan Spahn and Jeena Yi.

A father learns that closing the door to his past means shutting his daughter out in Good Enemy, Yilong Liu’s haunting and hopeful new play. When Howard (Francis Jue) makes a surprise cross-country trip to visit his college-age, Tik Tok-loving daughter, he’s forced to confront the realities of their relationship and the rift between them—a rift caused by Howard’s refusal to face memories of his life as a young man in China. In a smart, thrilling story that deftly weaves two generations and two continents amidst sweeping social changes, Good Enemy explores the power of human connections…affirming that no one lives an “ordinary” life, no matter how hard they might try.

Performances at Minetta Lane Theatre through Nov. 27. Tickets from $35 for Good Enemy are on sale now at www.Audible.com/MinettaLane.

Audible Theater is proud to collaborate with TodayTix to offer $20 mobile rush tickets beginning at 10am each performance day. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-served basis exclusively through the TodayTix app.

Opening Night of Yilong Liu’s GOOD ENEMY

Ryan Spahn, Ron Domingo, Chay Yew, Francis Jue, Yilong Liu, Geena Quintos, Jeena Yi, Tim Liu, Alec Silver, Emilia LaPenta – Producer of New Play Development and Commissions for Audible Theater. Photo by Lia Chang
Ryan Spahn, Ron Domingo, Chay Yew, Francis Jue, Yilong Liu, Geena Quintos, Jeena Yi, Tim Liu, Alec Silver, Emilia LaPenta – Producer of New Play Development and Commissions for Audible Theater. Photo by Lia Chang

Playwrights Horizons’ hosted a special AAPI night for Mia Chung’s Catch as Catch Can, directed by Daniel Aukin, which has performances through November 20.

Set deep in blue-collar New England, Catch as Catch Can centers on the Phelans and the Lavecchias as they welcome home a recently-engaged prodigal son-setting off an evolving crisis that reshapes their lives, and the play itself.

Cindy Cheung and Jon Norman Schneider in Playwrights Horizons' production of Mia Chung's CATCH AS CATCH CAN. Photo by Joan Marcus
Cindy Cheung and Jon Norman Schneider in Playwrights Horizons’ production of Mia Chung’s CATCH AS CATCH CAN. Photo by Joan Marcus

In this surprising, theatrically demanding work, actors double in roles of father and daughter, mothers and sons. As the families gather for the holidays, the weight of familial expectations bears down on the younger generation; such community pressure and the very meaning of family finds heightened expression in a theatrical high-wire act, as the actors acrobatically play across gender, generation, and race.

Rob Yang and Cindy Cheung in Playwrights Horizons’ production of Mia Chung’s CATCH AS CATCH CAN. Photo by Joan Marcus
Jon Norman Schneider, Cindy Cheung, Rob Yang. Photo by Lia Chang

The cast includes Cindy Cheung (Playwrights: Log Cabin; The Civilians’ The Great Immensity) as father Lon Lavecchia and daughter Daniela Lavecchia; Jon Norman Schneider (Awake and Sing!, The Oldest Boy) as mother Roberta Lavecchia and son Robbie Lavecchia; and Rob Yang (Succession, American Rust) as mother Theresa Phelan and son Tim Phelan.

Amaterasu Za is presenting Chushingura – 47 Ronin, adapted and directed by Ako Dachs, The production will be performed mainly in Japanese with English subtitles. Chushingura – 47 Ronin has been extended through November 13 at the A.R.T./New York Mezzanine Theater, 502 W. 53rd Street.

Chushingura – 47 Ronin is based on one of the most enduring stories in Japan. Portraying real events that took place in 1702-1703 during Japan’s Shogun-led Edo period, this sprawling story of honor, betrayal, clan loyalty, sacrifice, justice, and revenge has been told and retold in hundreds of ways in Japanese books, plays, movies, television dramas, and animated series. This new stage adaptation is  performed mainly in Japanese with some English and supertitles translation throughout.

The cast includes Ako (FX’s “Shogun.” Off Broadway: God Said This -Lortel nom.), Yoshi Amao (TV: “Shogun,” “Mr. Robot.”), Saori Goda, (NBC’s “Love Your Selfie”), Tatsuo Ichikawa (Apple TV+, “We Crashed”), Rina Maejima (A Chorus Line), Jun Suenaga (Film: Mother’s Day), Yasu Suzuki (Film: College Road Trip. NETFLIX’s “Daredevil”), Hiroko Yonekura (Regional: Avenue Q), and Minami Yoshimura (Regional: Godspell).

For more information about Amaterasu Za, please visit www.AmaterasuZa.org

Noah Diaz’s You Will Get Sick, directed by Sam Pinkleton and starring Daniel K. Isaac, Linda Lavin, Marinda Anderson, Nate Miller and Ryan Landani Sanchez. Performances at the Laura Pell Theater through Dec. 13.

Lauren Yee’s The Great Leap at Oklahoma City Rep through Nov. 20

James Aaron Oh and Brian Kim McCormick. Photo by Edward T. Morris

First Look: Brian Kim McCormick, Jenelle Chu, William Langan, and James Aaron Oh in Oklahoma City Repertory Theater‘s Oklahoma Premiere of Lauren Yee’s THE GREAT LEAP; Performances through Nov. 20 

Lloyd Suh’s The Far Country at Atlantic Theater Company – Nov. 17-Jan. 1
Atlantic Theater Company (Neil Pepe, Artistic Director; Jeffory Lawson, Managing Director) is presenting the world premiere production of The Far Country, an Atlantic commissioned play by Guggenheim fellow Lloyd Suh, directed by Obie Award winner Eric Ting.

The Far Country features Ben Chase (Mondo Tragic), Jinn S. Kim (Race, Religion & Politics), Whit K. Lee (Assassins), Christopher Liam Moore (All The Way), Shannon Tyo (The Chinese Lady), Amy Kim Waschke (Off-Broadway debut), and Eric Yang (Legacy).

The Far Country begins performances on Thursday, November 17th, and will open Monday, December 5th, for a limited engagement through Sunday, January 1st, 2023 Off-Broadway at the Linda Gross Theater (336 West 20th Street).

An intimate epic that follows an unlikely family’s journey from rural Taishan to the wild west of California in the wake of the Chinese Exclusion Act.

Schedule:
Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday at 7pm, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday at 8pm, Saturday and Sunday at 2pm.
Monday evening performance on 12/26 at 7pm.
Wednesday matinee performance on 12/7, 12/21 & 12/28 at 2pm.
No Sunday evening performance on 12/11.
No performance on Saturday, 12/24 and Sunday, 12/25.

Tickets:
Regular tickets begin at $75. Order online at atlantictheater.org or by calling AudienceView at 646-989-7996.

Atlantic is committed to connecting deeply and authentically with audiences from a broad range of economic backgrounds, ages, ethnicities, and perspectives. Its access ticket initiative makes $25 tickets available to every preview performance in the 2022|2023 season. Access tickets are sold on a first come, first served basis via Atlantic’s website beginning 2 weeks prior to the first performance of each Atlantic Theater Company 2022|2023 production. $25 access tickets for The Far Country are on sale now.

Shannon Tyo, Whit K. Lee, Ben Chase, Jinn S. Kim, Christopher Liam Moore, Amy Kim Waschke and Eric Yang Set for Atlantic Theater Company’s World Premiere of Lloyd Suh’s THE FAR COUNTRY, Nov. 17-Jan. 1

Phil Wong, Sumi Yu, Lawrence-Michael C. Arias, Nick Nakashima, Katrina Lauren McGraw, Brandon Leland, Naima Alakham, Alia Hodge, and Lucca Troutman Set for TheatreWorks Silicon Valley‘s LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS 

Thom Sesma in Classic Stage Company’s A Man of No Importance

Ken Leung in Will Arbery’s Evanston Salt Costs Climbing In previews

KPOP- Eddy Lee, Lina Lee, Kate Mina Lin, Jully Lee, Woo Sung Hyun ( kevin woo ), Zachary Noah Piser, Jinwoo Jung

Vichet Chum’s BALD SISTERS at Steppenwolf in Chicago – Dec. 1-Jan. 15, 2023 

The cast of BALD SISTERS includes, Francesca Fernandez McKenzie,
Jennifer Lim, Coburn Goss, Wai Ching Ho and Nima Rakhshanifar.

Rehearsals are underway for Steppenwolf’s world premiere of BALD SISTERS, written by Vichet Chum, directed by Jesca Prudencio. The next show in their new in-the-round Ensemble Theater in Chicago, BALD SISTERS invites you to get up close and personal with all the family drama—and comedy. The cast includes Francesca Fernandez McKenzie, Jennifer Lim, Coburn Goss, Wai Ching Ho and Nima Rakhshanifar.  FF10 online to get $10 off TICKETS to any preview or regular public performances.  Click here for more information regarding discounted tickets. Steppenwolf Theatre Company is located at 1650 N Halsted Ave, Chicago, IL 60614.

RECENTLY STAGED PRODUCTIONS

R.A. Shiomi’s Fire in the New World

Gregory Yang as Sam Shikaze and Anna Hashizume as Yumiko Alexander. Photo by LKBachman

Full Circle Theater presented the World Premiere of Fire in the New World, written and directed by Full Circle Co-Artistic Director R.A. Shiomi, at Park Square Theatre’s Proscenium Stage through Nov. 6.

The World Premiere was the third installment of Shiomi’s noir-style detective comedies featuring Sam Shikaze, the hard-boiled private eye who fights crime in Vancouver’s Japantown and beyond in the years after WWII. This time, Sam is up against a big time developer intent on bulldozing his community. But Sam is also hired to find the developer’s missing Japanese American wife. The play is a smart and fun detective comedy chock full of social commentary and sly intrigue.

The cast includes Gregory (Greg) Yang (he/him) as Sam Shikaze, Brian Joyce (he/him) as Jonathan Webster, Anna Hashizume (she/her) as Yumiko Alexander, Alice McGlave (she/her) as Rosie Ohara, Joe Allen (he/they) as Roderic Alexander, Keivin Vang (he/him), Song Kim (he/him) as Mas Matsumoto and Alec Berchem (he/him) as Tom Williams.

Qui Nguyen’s Vietgone at The Guthrie
In October, The Guthrie Theater presented Vietgone by Qui Nguyen, with original music by Shane Rettig and directed by Mina Morita on the Wurtele Thrust Stage at 818 South 2nd Street, Minneapolis, MN.

Hyunmin Rhee, Rebecca Hirota, Eric Sharp, Viet Vo, and Emjoy Gavino in Qui Nguyen’s VIETGONE at The Guthrie Theater. Photo: Dan Norman

Part history play and part memoir, Nguyen’s irreverent, whip-smart comedy uses flashbacks and bursts of rap music to share a human-centered view of the Vietnam War and its aftermath. When Saigon falls in 1975, Vietnamese refugees Quang (Hyunmin Rhee) and Tong (Emjoy Gavino) find themselves living in the land of “cheeseburgers, waffle fries and cholesterol” (aka America) — an intoxicating adventure that leads them to question their futures, both together and in their new country.

The cast of Vietgone features Emjoy Gavino (Guthrie: A Christmas Carol) as Tong/Ensemble, Rebecca Hirota (Guthrie: debut) as Thu/Huong/Ensemble, Hyunmin Rhee (Guthrie: debut) as Quang, Eric Sharp as Nhan/Khue/Ensemble (Guthrie: A Christmas Carol, As You Like It) and Viet Vo (Guthrie: debut) as Playwright/Bobby/Giai/Ensemble.

Viet Vo, Eric Sharp, Hyunmin Rhee in Qui Nguyen’s VIETGONE at The Guthrie Theater. Photo: Dan Norman

Jiehae Park’s peerless

Sasha Diamond, Benny Wayne Sully, Shannon Tyo in Jiehae Park’s peerless. Photo: James Leynse

PRIMARY STAGES and 59E59 Theaters, in association with Jamie deRoy, is presenting peerless, by Jiehae Park (Hannah and the Dread Gazebo) and directed by Margot Bordelon (… what the end will be). peerless played a limited run at 59E59’s Theater A (59 E 59th Street) through Nov. 6.

The cast of peerless features Marié Botha as “Dirty Girl/Preppy Girl,” Anthony Cason as “BF,” Sasha Diamond as “M,” Benny Wayne Sully as “D/Brother” and Shannon Tyo as “L.”

A darkly comedic twist on Shakespeare’s Macbeth set in the cutthroat world of elite college admissions, Jiehae Park’s clever and incisive adaptation, peerless, is a comedy…until it’s not.

This new version of the classic story centers on M and L, twin Asian-American siblings who have given up everything to get into The College. When another classmate claims what they feel is rightfully “their spot,” the twins decide they have only one option: murder.

Shannon Tyo, Sasha Diamond, Marié Botha, Anthony Cason, and Benny Wayne Sully in Jiehae Park’s “peerless” at 59E59 Theaters 

COST OF LIVING

David Zayas, Katy Sullivan, Kara Young and Gregg Mozgala. Photo by Zachary Maxwell Stertz

Manhattan Theatre Club extended the Broadway premiere of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Cost of Living, written by Martyna Majok (Sanctuary City, Ironbound) and directed by Obie Award winner Jo Bonney, at MTC’s Samuel J. Friedman Theatre through November 6.

Cost of Living‘s cast features acclaimed original stars Gregg Mozgala (Lucille Lortel Award winner for his performance) and Katy Sullivan (Theatre World Award winner for her performance), who reunite for the Broadway production; Tony Award nominee Kara Young (Clyde’s, The New Englanders at MTC); and David Zayas (“Dexter,” Anna in the Tropics).

Winner of the 2018 Pulitzer Prize, Martyna Majok’s powerhouse play receives its Broadway premiere after a celebrated run at MTC’s Stage I. Hailed by The New York Times as “gripping, immensely haunting and exquisitely attuned,” this insightful, intriguing work is about the forces that bring people together, the complexity of caring and being cared for, and the ways we all need each other in this world. Kara Young and David Zayas join acclaimed original stars Gregg Mozgala and Katy Sullivan in this production, again directed by Obie Award winner Jo Bonney.

Jason Ma, Francesca Fernandez McKenzie, Jojo Gonzalez, Eileen Rivera, Nelson T. Eusebio III, Valérie Thérèse Bart, Lia Chang. Photo by Rani O’Brien

Kansas City Repertory Theatre production of Twelfth Night – chatting with Nelson Eusebio, composer Jason Ma, Jojo Gonzalez.

KCRep’s TWELFTH NIGHT Featuring Jojo Gonzalez, Francesca Fernandez McKenzie, Brandon Jones, Vanessa Severo, Eileen Rivera, Freddy Acevedo, Jimmy Kieffer, Darrington Clark, Sam Cordes, Manon Halliburton, and Chelsea Rolfes

Lia Chang is an actor, a multi-media content producer, activist and an Award winning filmmaker and co-founder of Bev’s Girl Films, making films that foster inclusion and diversity on both sides of the camera. Lia is also the host and Executive Producer of BACKSTAGE PASS WITH LIA CHANG, a new Arts and Entertainment program that airs on Sundays at 6:30pm on FIOS 34, RCN 83, Spectrum 56/1996.

Bev’s Girl Films’ debut short film, Hide and Seek was a top ten film in the Asian American Film Lab’s 2015 72 Hour Shootout Filmmaking Competition, and she received a Best Actress nomination. Her short film, When the World Was Young recently garnered a 2021 DisOrient Film Audience Choice Award for Best Short Narrative. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman. She stars in and served as Executive Producer for the short independent films Hide and Seek, Balancing Act, Rom-Com Gone Wrong, Belongingness and When the World was Young. She is also the Executive Producer for The Cactus, The Language Lesson, The Writer and Cream and 2 Shugahs. BGF collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers, musicians and corporations.

All text, graphics, articles & photographs: © 2000-2022 Lia Chang Multimedia, unless otherwise indicated. All rights reserved. All materials contained on this site are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of Lia Chang, unless otherwise indicated. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content. For permission, please contact Lia at backstagepasswithliachang@gmail.com.

Nov. 4-27: Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Spotlights Chinese Representation in Hollywood During Cinema’s First Century Film Series Curated by Oscar®-Nominated Filmmaker Arthur Dong

The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures is presenting Hollywood Chinese: The First 100 Years, Nov. 4–27. The film series both critiques and celebrates Hollywood’s depictions of the Chinese and presents groundbreaking Chinese and Chinese American artists who navigated industry challenges from the beginning of film history to now. Curated by Oscar-nominated filmmaker Arthur Dong, Hollywood Chinese takes a wide look at practices and depictions from the past and what we can learn from them today.

Jack Soo, Nancy Kwan, Miyoshi Umeki, James Shigeta on a lobby card of FLOWER DRUM SONG.

This series includes screenings, as well as a number of double features, taking place throughout the month of November. Each will be shown in the museum’s Ted Mann Theater.

November’s Oscar® Sundays are also programmed as part of the series Hollywood Chinese: The First 100 Years, guest programmed by Arthur Dong.

TOP: Joan Chen, James Hong, Nancy Kwan, Ang Lee, Christopher Lee.
MIDDLE: Luise Rainer, James Shigeta, Amy Tan, B.D. Wong, Wayne Wang.
BOTTOM: Tsai Chin, David Henry Hwang, Lisa Lu, Justin Lin, Turhan Bey.

• Nov. 4, 2022 | 7:30 pm | Hollywood Chinese – Arthur Dong & Jacqueline Stewart in conversation
• Nov. 5, 2022 | 2 pm | Daughter of the Dragon with King of Chinatown-Introduction by Anna Wong (AMW’s niece)
• Nov. 5, 2022 | 7:30 pm |Big Trouble in Little China with Black Widow – In person – Q & A with James Hong, Dennis Dun and Peter Kwong
• Nov. 6, 2022 | 7:30 pm | Lost Horizon
• Nov. 11, 2022 | 7:30 pm | Walk Like a Dragon with Enter the Dragon – In Conversation: Nancy Kwan, friend/colleague to James Shigeta & Bruce Lee
• Nov. 12, 2022 | 2 pm | Six Early Films, 1900–1929
• Nov. 12, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Tong-Man with Year of the Dragon – In person: Dennis Dun
• Nov. 13, 2022 | 7:30pm | 7 Faces of Dr. Lao
• Nov. 18, 2022 | 7:30 pm | Gay Night: M. Butterfly with The Wedding Banquet – Introduction by Andrew Ahn (Spa, Fire Island)
• Nov. 19, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Sand Pebbles
• Nov. 25, 2022 | 7:30 pm | Flower Drum Song –In person: Nancy Kwang, Irene Tsu
• Nov. 26, 2022 | 3 pm | Our Gang: Baby Blues with Charlie Chan in Honolulu – In person: Margie Chun Moon, original Charle Chan kid
• Nov. 26, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Joy Luck Club -Special guests TBA
• Nov. 27, 2022 | 2 pm | The Arch with Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl – In person: Joan Chen
• Nov. 27, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Last Emperor – In person: Joan Chen

SCREENING DETAILS

Nov. 4, 2022 | 7: 30 pm |
Hollywood Chinese: With a treasure trove of clips from over 90 films, Hollywood Chinese traces the American film industry’s representation of the Chinese during its first 100 years. Scenes ranging from the first feature film made by Chinese Americans in 1917 to breakout Oscar wins are interwoven with interviews of Chinese and Chinese American artists who reveal stories of working in Hollywood. White actors, such as Luise Rainer and Christopher Lee, recall their yellowface performances to explain the now-controversial practice. Hollywood Chinese, produced and directed by series Guest Programmer Arthur Dong, is a fitting roadmap to embark on the upcoming film series.

Nov. 5, 2022 | 2 pm |
Daughter of the Dragon: After Anna May Wong’s breakthrough romantic role in The Toll of the Sea (1922), Hollywood relegated her
to mostly stereotypical villainous parts, including the sadistic daughter of the evil Fu Manchu in Daughter of the Dragon. Wong stars opposite silent film idol Sessue Hayakawa, both in their first sound film, with both speaking standard English at a time before Hollywood latched on to the common practice of directing Asian characters to deliver dialogue in overblown, accented broken English.

King of Chinatown: Under contract with Paramount, Anna May Wong embarked on a series of films upon which she exercised more input, starting with Daughter of Shanghai (1938), about which Wong declared, “We have the sympathetic parts for a change.” King of Chinatown casts Wong as a prominent Chinese American doctor
raising funds for the Red Cross in war-torn China, inspired by the real-life Chinese American physician Dr. Margaret Chung. This fictionalized crime drama features Korean American actor Philip Ahn as Wong’s romantic interest, playing a lawyer out to expose corruption in the underbelly of Chinatown.


Nov. 5, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Big Trouble in Little China: James Hong gives a show stopping performance as sorcerer Lo Pan in this cult favorite. Directed by horror-meister John Carpenter, Big Trouble in Little China takes a supernatural spin on Hollywood’s Chinatown tropes, populating the neighborhood with mystical beings Kurt Russell plays an antihero, but he’s not the typical white savior—he’s an outsider who’s clueless without his Chinese American friend Wang Chi, portrayed with modest aplomb by Dennis Dun Veteran actor Victor Wong offers crusty comic relief as a sorcerer-cum-tour bus driver. Special guests: James Hong and Peter Kwong in conversation following the Big Trouble in Little China screening.

Black Widow: With over 500 acting credits to his name, including scene-stealing performances in Chinatown (1974), Blade Runner (1982), and Kung Fu Panda (2008), James Hong counts Black Widow as one of his favorites. In this crime drama centered on the case of a murderess, Hong first appears mid-point a sa drug addicted investigator. For the role, the actor drew upon his improvisation training and bi-cultural background: “I just say the lines that are in my head, and of course what’s in my head is cussing out in Chinese to Debra Winger—all patterned after all those Chinese people who came to my dad’s herb store in Minnesota.”

Nov. 6, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Lost Horizon: This Frank Capra-directed classic is emblematic of how Hollywood constructed paradise—by way of China. The Oscarwinning art direction presents an opulent Shangri-La, yet the story is predicated on the subjugation of the Chinese by white saviors and colonialist, missionary ideals. The National Film Registry considered the film differently, however, when in 2016 it honored the film as “an emotional respite to an American public seeking escape from the Depression and yearning for their own personal utopias.” Lost Horizon received seven Oscar nominations, including Best Picture, and produced wins for Film Editing (Stephen Goosson) and Art Direction (Gene Havlick, Gene Milford).

Nov. 11, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Walk Like a Dragon: James Shigeta was a Japanese American singer whom Hollywood studios recruited to shape into a leading man— even casting him opposite white lovers. In the western Walk Like a Dragon, Shigeta portrays a Chinese immigrant who defies racism in 1870s California, winning a shoot-out against Mel Tormé and winning the girl, a formerly enslaved Chinese woman (Nobu McCarthy) who was previously saved by Jack Lord’s character Linc Bartlett. Lead roles for Shigeta diminished after Flower Drum Song (1961) as theHollywood studio system faded—but that didn’t stop Shigeta from working, including as the iconic Joseph Takagi in Die Hard (1988).

Pre-screening conversation with Nancy Kwan where she will discuss working with James Shigeta and Bruce Lee.

Enter the Dragon: Martial arts films were popular with Chinese audiences since the 1920s but it took Bruce Lee’s star power for the genre to catch fire worldwide. Born in San Francisco, Lee ignited his movie career in Hong Kong, experienced a frustrating career in the United States, and returned to Hong Kong where he directed and starred in hit films that caught the attention of Warner Bros. This all culminated with Lee’s seminal blockbuster, Enter the Dragon. “For Asian Americans, Bruce Lee wasn’t just exciting and cool. He was somebody who very deeply moved us, because he was us.”—Nancy Wang Yuen, media scholar

Nov. 12, 2022 | 2 pm |
Six Early Films, 1900-1929: For much of the history of Hollywood filmmaking, movies often portrayed Chinese as the “other” in a “them vs. us” hierarchy. Early movies, in particular, exploited this dichotomy, illustrated by the now-absurd—but no less damning—examples in this program. Yet, this era also saw productions from pioneering- Chinese American filmmakers who aspired to elevate onscreen representations of themselves. The films are as follows: Massacre of the Christians by the Chinese, The Heathen Chinese and the Sunday School Teachers, That Chink at Golden Gulch, The Curse of Quon Gwon, Lotus Blossom, and The Letter.

Special guests: Family members of filmmaker James B. Leong will join us for a post-screening conversation.

Nov. 12, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
The Tong-Man: Japan-born silent screen idol Sessue Hayakawa produced and starred as the titular Tong-Man. Ostensibly a love story set in San Francisco Chinatown, the film’s infusion of lurid hatchet murders and opium tong wars sparked the first legal action known to be filed by the Chinese American community against Hollywood’s depiction of the Chinese. The effort failed, and instead created free publicity and soaring box office receipts. Ironically, the film was supposed to be Hayakawa’s path away from racialized Hollywood typecasting.

Year of the Dragon: With a screenplay co-written by Oliver Stone and director Michael Cimino, this violent vision of 1980s New York Chinatown gang wars triggered nationwide protests by the Asian American community for its racist and sexist portrayals. Bowing to pressure, distributors added a disclaimer denying any intent to denigrate Asian Americans. No yellowfaced white actors were used, but Asian American cast members were caught in a controversial crossfire. The film, ultimately, was a box office flop.

Nov. 13, 2022 | 7:30pm |
7 Faces of Dr. Lao: Tony Randall portrays multiple identities in George Pal’s fantasy set in 1800s Arizona. The title character, Dr. Lao, features Randall in yellowface as he cunningly switches between broken and codespeak English to challenge corruption and intolerant attitudes. Artist and sculptor Wah Ming Chang served on the team that created the film’s Oscar-nominated special visual effects (Jim Danforth received the nomination for this achievement). Chang was also on the team responsible for the Oscar-winning visual effects in The Time Machine (1960). An honorary Oscar was awarded to William Tuttle for his makeup work on 7 Faces of Dr. Lao, yellowface included.

Nov. 18 | 7:30 pm |

M. Butterfly: A cross-dressing Peking opera performer-cum-spyand a delusional French diplomat are unlikely lovers in David Henry Hwang’s explosive re-visioning of East/West sexual dynamics in M. Butterfly.  Based on Hwang’s Tony Award-winning play set during China’s Cultural Revolution, John Lone and Jeremy Irons portray two men who convolute Western ideals of femininity and masculinity, where the East is submissive and the West is dominant, and where Asian men are feminized and more desirable as female than as male. David Cronenberg directed this richly designed production, which was inspired by a true story.

The Wedding Banquet: Before Ang Lee directed his heartrending examination ofrepressed homosexuality in the Oscar-winning Brokeback Mountain (2005), he directed The Wedding Banquet, a playful comedy of manners involving a gay Chinese American New Yorker and his white boyfriend who fake a heterosexual
marriage to quell nagging parents. The scheme sets the stage for lighthearted explorations of family, self-identity, cultural values, and sexual politics. The US/Taiwan co-production earned an Academy Award nomination for Best International Feature Film, propelling Lee’s career worldwide.

Nov. 19, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
The Sand Pebbles: Robert Wise’s follow-up to The Sound of Music (1965) netted eight Oscar nominations, including a Best Supporting Actor mention for Mako’s endearing portrait of a Chinese coolie. Hong Kong and Taiwan provide the locations for this widescreen spectacle—an exotic 1920s China in revolutionary turmoil, where Chinese women are prostitutes and Chinese men are ruthless, where colonialism and missionaries are the norms, and the leading man is always a white savior. The Sand Pebbles kickstarted Mako’s distinguished career in film, stage, and television, and as co-founder of the nation’s leading Asian American theater group, the East West Players, in Los Angeles. Fellow founders James Hong and Beulah Quo also appear in The Sand Pebbles.

Nov. 25, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Flower Drum Song: Flower Drum Song represents a Hollywood milestone for Chinese American representation with its all-dancing, allsinging, and almost all-Asian cast, headlined by James Shigeta, Oscar-winner Miyoshi Umeki, Jack Soo, Benson Fong, Patrick Adiarte, and Nancy Kwan in her follow-up to The World of Suzie Wong (1960); Juanita Hall reprised her yellowfaced Broadway portrayal of Madame Liang. This lavish romantic comedy gave many Americans their first look at Chinatown beyond tourist facades and was later inducted into the National Film Registry for its stories of immigration and cultural assimilation. The musical, with joyful tunes by Rodgers and Hammerstein, earned five Oscar nominations for art direction, cinematography, and costumes, as well as its music scoring, and sound. Hermes Pan choreographed the lively routines.

Special guest: Post-screening conversation with actress Nancy Kwan

Nov. 26, 2022 | 3 pm | O
Our Gang: Baby Blues: “Every 4th child is born Chinese.” This questionable Almanac factoid ignites Our Gang member Mickey’s fears that his unborn sibling will end up being Chinese. What’s he afraid of? Perhaps he’ll learn something from Eddie and Jennifer Lee, two veteran Hollywood movie extras who portray the parents of a boy rescued from racist bullies by the kids in Our Gang. The Lees’ real-life daughters, Faye and Margie, appeared as Charlie Chan’s kids in Charlie Chan in Honolulu (1939). Anti-Asian violence, racial slurs, Confucianism, and white saviorism: it’s all packed into this ten-minute short that, in the end, is a call for tolerance.

Charlie Chan in Honolulu: Just one of over forty films in the popular Charlie Chan detective franchise, Charlie Chan in Honolulu emphasizes family, with the plot bookended by the birth of a grandchild. A raucous family meal with Chan’s kids opens the film, pushing the patriarch to command, “Save football tactics for gridiron!” Audience members who cringe at the sight of yellowfaced white actors might want to wear blinders and earplugs when Sidney Toler appears as Chan, replete with slanted eyes and dubious aphorisms, in order to enjoy some spirited scenes with Victor Sen Yung and Layne Tom Jr. as his all-American sons.

Nov. 26, 2022 | 7:30 pm |

The Joy Luck Club: In the history of Hollywood studio films, only a handful have centered on contemporary Chinese American characters and cast with mostly Asian actors: Flower Drum Song (1961), The Joy Luck Club (1993), Crazy Rich Asians (2018), The Farewell (2019), and Everything Everywhere All at Once (2022). Based on Amy Tan’s novel about mother/daughter relationships, The Joy Luck Club was guided by Tan as co-producer and co-writer and Janet Yang as executive producer, with auteur Wayne Wang directing what became his pivot into main-stream studio filmmaking. Hiring white performers in yellowface was off-limits, and the film boasts an ensemble cast of trailblazing Asian American actors from two generations: veteran actresses Tsai Chin, Kieu Chinh, Lisa Lu, and France Nuyen portrayed the mothers, while Rosalind Chao, Tamlyn Tomita, Lauren Tom, and Ming-Na Wen played the daughters.

Nov. 27, 2022 | 2 pm |
The Arch: Lisa Lu’s first Hollywood role was as a bar girl in China Doll (1958). Frustrated with typecasting, Lu travelled to Hong Kong for The Arch, portraying a woman in 1700s China confined by rules of chastity. The film was made by one of Hong Kong’s earliest female directors, Tang Shu Shuen, and considered the region’s first art film to reach international audiences. Mixing naturalism with techniques like freeze frames and double exposures, the black-and white film was co-edited by Les Blank and co-photographed by Satyajit Ray’s frequent cinematographer Subrata Mitra. The Arch launched Lu’s distinguished acting career in Asia, which then thrived transnationally in America (The Last Emperor, The Joy Luck Club, Crazy Rich Asians).

Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl: After her breakthrough appearance in Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Last Emperor (1987), Joan Chen was offered parts that mainly exploited her ethnic allure. She recalled, “If I didn’t leave Hollywood, I would have never directed Xiu Xiu”—and leave she did to direct and co-write Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl. The independently produced film centered on a young girl relocated to the countryside during China’s Cultural Revolution. Exquisitely shot on location in Tibet, Xiu Xiu won seven Golden Horse Awards, including director and writer nods for Chen.

Special guest: Post-screening conversation with writer/director Joan Chen.

Nov. 27, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
The Last Emperor: In 2015, #OscarsSoWhite went viral and fueled a movement that exposed the decades-long scarcity of Academy Award nominations for people of color in acting categories. In the Oscars’ 94-year history, only three Best Picture winners featured mostly Asian casts, and none of these received any acting nominations: Parasite (2019), Slumdog Millionaire (2008), and The Last Emperor, which won nine of nine nominations. This presentation of The Last Emperor not only celebrates the breathtaking imagination of director Bernardo Bertolucci’s epic vison of China, but also gives audiences a chance to reconsider the Academy’s omission of honors for its brilliant cast.

Special guest: Post-screening conversation with writer/director Joan Chen.

TICKETS Tickets to the Academy Museum are available only through advance online reservations via the Academy Museum’s website and mobile app.

Film screening tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors (age 62+), and $5 for students and children (age 17-). Matinees are $5 for all. Ticket prices for Academy Museum members are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors, and $4 for students, children, and matinee-goers.

General admission tickets for the museum’s exhibitions are $25 for adults, $19 for seniors (age 62+), and $15 for students. Admission for visitors ages 17 and younger, and for California residents with an EBT card is free.

COVID PROTOCOL
Visitors are required to follow all current COVID-19 public health guidelines by the state of California and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health in place at the time of their visit.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY MUSEUM
The Academy Museum is the largest institution in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Academy Museum Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries will be open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

Academy Museum film programming supported by the Richard Roth Foundation.

Academy Museum film programming generously funded by the Richard Roth Foundation. Donors to the Academy Museum’s fund in support of Asian American Pacific Islander programming include Esther S. M. Chui-Chao, Julia and Ken Gouw, and Dr. Peter Lam Kin Ngok of Media Asia Group Holdings Limited.

Lia Chang

Lia Chang is an actor, a multi-media content producer, activist and an Award winning filmmaker and co-founder of Bev’s Girl Films, making films that foster inclusion and diversity on both sides of the camera. Lia is also the host and Executive Producer of BACKSTAGE PASS WITH LIA CHANG, a new Arts and Entertainment program that airs on Sundays at 6:30pm on FIOS 34, RCN 83, Spectrum 56/1996.

Bev’s Girl Films’ debut short film, Hide and Seek was a top ten film in the Asian American Film Lab’s 2015 72 Hour Shootout Filmmaking Competition, and she received a Best Actress nomination. Her short film, When the World Was Young recently garnered a 2021 DisOrient Film Audience Choice Award for Best Short Narrative. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman. She stars in and served as Executive Producer for the short independent films Hide and Seek, Balancing Act, Rom-Com Gone Wrong, Belongingness and When the World was Young. She is also the Executive Producer for The Cactus, The Language Lesson, The Writer and Cream and 2 Shugahs. BGF collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers, musicians and corporations.

All text, graphics, articles & photographs: © 2000-2022 Lia Chang Multimedia. All rights reserved. All materials contained on this site are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of Lia Chang, unless otherwise indicated. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content. For permission, please contact Lia at backstagepasswithliachang@gmail.com.

Nov. 4-27: Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Spotlights Chinese Representation in Hollywood During Cinema’s First Century Film Series Curated by Oscar®-Nominated Filmmaker Arthur Dong

The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures will present Hollywood Chinese: The First 100 Years, Nov. 4–27. The film series both critiques and celebrates Hollywood’s depictions of the Chinese and presents groundbreaking Chinese and Chinese American artists who navigated industry challenges from the beginning of film history to now. Curated by Oscar-nominated filmmaker Arthur Dong, Hollywood Chinese takes a wide look at practices and depictions from the past and what we can learn from them today.

Jack Soo, Nancy Kwan, Miyoshi Umeki, James Shigeta on a lobby card of FLOWER DRUM SONG.

This series includes screenings, as well as a number of double features, taking place throughout the month of November. Each will be shown in the museum’s Ted Mann Theater.

November’s Oscar® Sundays are also programmed as part of the series Hollywood Chinese: The First 100 Years, guest programmed by Arthur Dong.

• Nov. 4, 2022 | 7:30 pm | Hollywood Chinese
• Nov. 5, 2022 | 2 pm | Daughter of the Dragon with King of Chinatown
• Nov. 5, 2022 | 7:30 pm |Big Trouble in Little China with Black Widow
• Nov. 6, 2022 | 7:30 pm | Lost Horizon
• Nov. 11, 2022 | 7:30 pm | Walk Like a Dragon with Enter the Dragon
• Nov. 12, 2022 | 2 pm | Six Early Films, 1900–1929
• Nov. 12, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Tong-Man with Year of the Dragon
• Nov. 13, 2022 | 7:30pm | 7 Faces of Dr. Lao
• Nov. 18, 2022 | 7:30 pm | M. Butterfly with The Wedding Banquet
• Nov. 19, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Sand Pebbles
• Nov. 25, 2022 | 7:30 pm | Flower Drum Song
• Nov. 26, 2022 | 3 pm | Our Gang: Baby Blues with Charlie Chan in Honolulu
• Nov. 26, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Joy Luck Club
• Nov. 27, 2022 | 2 pm | The Arch with Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl
• Nov. 27, 2022 | 7:30 pm | The Last Emperor

SCREENING DETAILS

Nov. 4, 2022 | 7: 30 pm |
Hollywood Chinese: With a treasure trove of clips from over 90 films, Hollywood Chinese traces the American film industry’s representation of the Chinese during its first 100 years. Scenes ranging from the first feature film made by Chinese Americans in 1917 to breakout Oscar wins are interwoven with interviews of Chinese and Chinese American artists who reveal stories of working in Hollywood. White actors, such as Luise Rainer and Christopher Lee, recall their yellowface performances to explain the now-controversial practice. Hollywood Chinese, produced and directed by series Guest Programmer Arthur Dong, is a fitting roadmap to embark on the upcoming film series.

Nov. 5, 2022 | 2 pm |
Daughter of the Dragon: After Anna May Wong’s breakthrough romantic role in The Toll of the Sea (1922), Hollywood relegated her
to mostly stereotypical villainous parts, including the sadistic daughter of the evil Fu Manchu in Daughter of the Dragon. Wong stars opposite silent film idol Sessue Hayakawa, both in their first sound film, with both speaking standard English at a time before Hollywood latched on to the common practice of directing Asian characters to deliver dialogue in overblown, accented broken English.

King of Chinatown: Under contract with Paramount, Anna May Wong embarked on a series of films upon which she exercised more input, starting with Daughter of Shanghai (1938), about which Wong declared, “We have the sympathetic parts for a change.” King of Chinatown casts Wong as a prominent Chinese American doctor
raising funds for the Red Cross in war-torn China, inspired by the real-life Chinese American physician Dr. Margaret Chung. This fictionalized crime drama features Korean American actor Philip Ahn as Wong’s romantic interest, playing a lawyer out to expose corruption in the underbelly of Chinatown.

Nov. 5, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Big Trouble in Little China: James Hong gives a show stopping performance as sorcerer Lo Pan in this cult favorite. Directed by horror-meister John Carpenter, Big Trouble in Little China takes a supernatural spin on Hollywood’s Chinatown tropes, populating the neighborhood with mystical beings Kurt Russell plays an antihero, but he’s not the typical white savior—he’s an outsider who’s clueless without his Chinese American friend Wang Chi, portrayed with modest aplomb by Dennis Dun Veteran actor Victor Wong offers crusty comic relief as a sorcerer-cum-tour bus driver. Special guests: James Hong and Peter Kwong in conversation following the Big Trouble in Little China screening.

Black Widow: With over 500 acting credits to his name, including scene-stealing performances in Chinatown (1974), Blade Runner (1982), and Kung Fu Panda (2008), James Hong counts Black Widow as one of his favorites. In this crime drama centered on the case of a murderess, Hong first appears mid-point a sa drug addicted investigator. For the role, the actor drew upon his improvisation training and bi-cultural background: “I just say the lines that are in my head, and of course what’s in my head is cussing out in Chinese to Debra Winger—all patterned after all those Chinese people who came to my dad’s herb store in Minnesota.”

Nov. 6, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Lost Horizon: This Frank Capra-directed classic is emblematic of how Hollywood constructed paradise—by way of China. The Oscarwinning art direction presents an opulent Shangri-La, yet the story is predicated on the subjugation of the Chinese by white saviors and colonialist, missionary ideals. The National Film Registry considered the film differently, however, when in 2016 it honored the film as “an emotional respite to an American public seeking escape from the Depression and yearning for their own personal utopias.” Lost Horizon received seven Oscar nominations, including Best Picture, and produced wins for Film Editing (Stephen Goosson) and Art Direction (Gene Havlick, Gene Milford).

Nov. 11, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Walk Like a Dragon: James Shigeta was a Japanese American singer whom Hollywood studios recruited to shape into a leading man— even casting him opposite white lovers. In the western Walk Like a Dragon, Shigeta portrays a Chinese immigrant who defies racism in 1870s California, winning a shoot-out against Mel Tormé and winning the girl, a formerly enslaved Chinese woman (Nobu McCarthy) who was previously saved by Jack Lord’s character Linc Bartlett. Lead roles for Shigeta diminished after Flower Drum Song (1961) as theHollywood studio system faded—but that didn’t stop Shigeta from working, including as the iconic Joseph Takagi in Die Hard (1988).

Pre-screening conversation with Nancy Kwan where she will discuss working with James Shigeta and Bruce Lee.

Enter the Dragon: Martial arts films were popular with Chinese audiences since the 1920s but it took Bruce Lee’s star power for the genre to catch fire worldwide. Born in San Francisco, Lee ignited his movie career in Hong Kong, experienced a frustrating career in the United States, and returned to Hong Kong where he directed and starred in hit films that caught the attention of Warner Bros. This all culminated with Lee’s seminal blockbuster, Enter the Dragon. “For Asian Americans, Bruce Lee wasn’t just exciting and cool. He was somebody who very deeply moved us, because he was us.”—Nancy Wang Yuen, media scholar

Nov. 12, 2022 | 2 pm |
Six Early Films, 1900-1929: For much of the history of Hollywood filmmaking, movies often portrayed Chinese as the “other” in a “them vs. us” hierarchy. Early movies, in particular, exploited this dichotomy, illustrated by the now-absurd—but no less damning—examples in this program. Yet, this era also saw productions from pioneering- Chinese American filmmakers who aspired to elevate onscreen representations of themselves. The films are as follows: Massacre of the Christians by the Chinese, The Heathen Chinese and the Sunday School Teachers, That Chink at Golden Gulch, The Curse of Quon Gwon, Lotus Blossom, and The Letter.

Special guests: Family members of filmmaker James B. Leong will join us for a post-screening conversation.

Nov. 12, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
The Tong-Man: Japan-born silent screen idol Sessue Hayakawa produced and starred as the titular Tong-Man. Ostensibly a love story set in San Francisco Chinatown, the film’s infusion of lurid hatchet murders and opium tong wars sparked the first legal action known to be filed by the Chinese American community against Hollywood’s depiction of the Chinese. The effort failed, and instead created free publicity and soaring box office receipts. Ironically, the film was supposed to be Hayakawa’s path away from racialized Hollywood typecasting.

Year of the Dragon: With a screenplay co-written by Oliver Stone and director Michael Cimino, this violent vision of 1980s New York Chinatown gang wars triggered nationwide protests by the Asian American community for its racist and sexist portrayals. Bowing to pressure, distributors added a disclaimer denying any intent to denigrate Asian Americans. No yellowfaced white actors were used, but Asian American cast members were caught in a controversial crossfire. The film, ultimately, was a box office flop.

Nov. 13, 2022 | 7:30pm |
7 Faces of Dr. Lao: Tony Randall portrays multiple identities in George Pal’s fantasy set in 1800s Arizona. The title character, Dr. Lao, features Randall in yellowface as he cunningly switches between broken and codespeak English to challenge corruption and intolerant attitudes. Artist and sculptor Wah Ming Chang served on the team that created the film’s Oscar-nominated special visual effects (Jim Danforth received the nomination for this achievement). Chang was also on the team responsible for the Oscar-winning visual effects in The Time Machine (1960). An honorary Oscar was awarded to William Tuttle for his makeup work on 7 Faces of Dr. Lao, yellowface included.

Nov. 18 | 7:30 pm |

M. Butterfly: A cross-dressing Peking opera performer-cum-spyand a delusional French diplomat are unlikely lovers in David Henry Hwang’s explosive re-visioning of East/West sexual dynamics in M. Butterfly.  Based on Hwang’s Tony Award-winning play set during China’s Cultural Revolution, John Lone and Jeremy Irons portray two men who convolute Western ideals of femininity and masculinity, where the East is submissive and the West is dominant, and where Asian men are feminized and more desirable as female than as male. David Cronenberg directed this richly designed production, which was inspired by a true story.

The Wedding Banquet: Before Ang Lee directed his heartrending examination ofrepressed homosexuality in the Oscar-winning Brokeback Mountain (2005), he directed The Wedding Banquet, a playful comedy of manners involving a gay Chinese American New Yorker and his white boyfriend who fake a heterosexual
marriage to quell nagging parents. The scheme sets the stage for lighthearted explorations of family, self-identity, cultural values, and sexual politics. The US/Taiwan co-production earned an Academy Award nomination for Best International Feature Film, propelling Lee’s career worldwide.

Nov. 19, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
The Sand Pebbles: Robert Wise’s follow-up to The Sound of Music (1965) netted eight Oscar nominations, including a Best Supporting Actor mention for Mako’s endearing portrait of a Chinese coolie. Hong Kong and Taiwan provide the locations for this widescreen spectacle—an exotic 1920s China in revolutionary turmoil, where Chinese women are prostitutes and Chinese men are ruthless, where colonialism and missionaries are the norms, and the leading man is always a white savior. The Sand Pebbles kickstarted Mako’s distinguished career in film, stage, and television, and as co-founder of the nation’s leading Asian American theater group, the East West Players, in Los Angeles. Fellow founders James Hong and Beulah Quo also appear in The Sand Pebbles.

Nov. 25, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
Flower Drum Song: Flower Drum Song represents a Hollywood milestone for Chinese American representation with its all-dancing, allsinging, and almost all-Asian cast, headlined by James Shigeta, Oscar-winner Miyoshi Umeki, Jack Soo, Benson Fong, Patrick Adiarte, and Nancy Kwan in her follow-up to The World of Suzie Wong (1960); Juanita Hall reprised her yellowfaced Broadway portrayal of Madame Liang. This lavish romantic comedy gave many Americans their first look at Chinatown beyond tourist facades and was later inducted into the National Film Registry for its stories of immigration and cultural assimilation. The musical, with joyful tunes by Rodgers and Hammerstein, earned five Oscar nominations for art direction, cinematography, and costumes, as well as its music scoring, and sound. Hermes Pan choreographed the lively routines.

Special guest: Post-screening conversation with actress Nancy Kwan

Nov. 26, 2022 | 3 pm | O
Our Gang: Baby Blues: “Every 4th child is born Chinese.” This questionable Almanac factoid ignites Our Gang member Mickey’s fears that his unborn sibling will end up being Chinese. What’s he afraid of? Perhaps he’ll learn something from Eddie and Jennifer Lee, two veteran Hollywood movie extras who portray the parents of a boy rescued from racist bullies by the kids in Our Gang. The Lees’ real-life daughters, Faye and Margie, appeared as Charlie Chan’s kids in Charlie Chan in Honolulu (1939). Anti-Asian violence, racial slurs, Confucianism, and white saviorism: it’s all packed into this ten-minute short that, in the end, is a call for tolerance.

Charlie Chan in Honolulu: Just one of over forty films in the popular Charlie Chan detective franchise, Charlie Chan in Honolulu emphasizes family, with the plot bookended by the birth of a grandchild. A raucous family meal with Chan’s kids opens the film, pushing the patriarch to command, “Save football tactics for gridiron!” Audience members who cringe at the sight of yellowfaced white actors might want to wear blinders and earplugs when Sidney Toler appears as Chan, replete with slanted eyes and dubious aphorisms, in order to enjoy some spirited scenes with Victor Sen Yung and Layne Tom Jr. as his all-American sons.

Nov. 26, 2022 | 7:30 pm |

The Joy Luck Club: In the history of Hollywood studio films, only a handful have centered on contemporary Chinese American characters and cast with mostly Asian actors: Flower Drum Song (1961), The Joy Luck Club (1993), Crazy Rich Asians (2018), The Farewell (2019), and Everything Everywhere All at Once (2022). Based on Amy Tan’s novel about mother/daughter relationships, The Joy Luck Club was guided by Tan as co-producer and co-writer and Janet Yang as executive producer, with auteur Wayne Wang directing what became his pivot into main-stream studio filmmaking. Hiring white performers in yellowface was off-limits, and the film boasts an ensemble cast of trailblazing Asian American actors from two generations: veteran actresses Tsai Chin, Kieu Chinh, Lisa Lu, and France Nuyen portrayed the mothers, while Rosalind Chao, Tamlyn Tomita, Lauren Tom, and Ming-Na Wen played the daughters.

Nov. 27, 2022 | 2 pm |
The Arch: Lisa Lu’s first Hollywood role was as a bar girl in China Doll (1958). Frustrated with typecasting, Lu travelled to Hong Kong for The Arch, portraying a woman in 1700s China confined by rules of chastity. The film was made by one of Hong Kong’s earliest female directors, Tang Shu Shuen, and considered the region’s first art film to reach international audiences. Mixing naturalism with techniques like freeze frames and double exposures, the black-and white film was co-edited by Les Blank and co-photographed by Satyajit Ray’s frequent cinematographer Subrata Mitra. The Arch launched Lu’s distinguished acting career in Asia, which then thrived transnationally in America (The Last Emperor, The Joy Luck Club, Crazy Rich Asians).

Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl: After her breakthrough appearance in Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Last Emperor (1987), Joan Chen was offered parts that mainly exploited her ethnic allure. She recalled, “If I didn’t leave Hollywood, I would have never directed Xiu Xiu”—and leave she did to direct and co-write Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl. The independently produced film centered on a young girl relocated to the countryside during China’s Cultural Revolution. Exquisitely shot on location in Tibet, Xiu Xiu won seven Golden Horse Awards, including director and writer nods for Chen.

Special guest: Post-screening conversation with writer/director Joan Chen.

Nov. 27, 2022 | 7:30 pm |
The Last Emperor: In 2015, #OscarsSoWhite went viral and fueled a movement that exposed the decades-long scarcity of Academy Award nominations for people of color in acting categories. In the Oscars’ 94-year history, only three Best Picture winners featured mostly Asian casts, and none of these received any acting nominations: Parasite (2019), Slumdog Millionaire (2008), and The Last Emperor, which won nine of nine nominations. This presentation of The Last Emperor not only celebrates the breathtaking imagination of director Bernardo Bertolucci’s epic vison of China, but also gives audiences a chance to reconsider the Academy’s omission of honors for its brilliant cast.

TICKETS Tickets to the Academy Museum are available only through advance online reservations via the Academy Museum’s website and mobile app.

Film screening tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors (age 62+), and $5 for students and children (age 17-). Matinees are $5 for all. Ticket prices for Academy Museum members are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors, and $4 for students, children, and matinee-goers.

General admission tickets for the museum’s exhibitions are $25 for adults, $19 for seniors (age 62+), and $15 for students. Admission for visitors ages 17 and younger, and for California residents with an EBT card is free.

COVID PROTOCOL
Visitors are required to follow all current COVID-19 public health guidelines by the state of California and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health in place at the time of their visit.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY MUSEUM
The Academy Museum is the largest institution in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Academy Museum Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries will be open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

Academy Museum film programming supported by the Richard Roth Foundation.

Academy Museum film programming generously funded by the Richard Roth Foundation. Donors to the Academy Museum’s fund in support of Asian American Pacific Islander programming include Esther S. M. Chui-Chao, Julia and Ken Gouw, and Dr. Peter Lam Kin Ngok of Media Asia Group Holdings Limited.

Watch Disney and Pixar’s “Turning Red” During a Southern California-Exclusive Limited Engagement at El Capitan Theatre Starting March 11

Disney and Pixar’s new animated feature “Turning Red” comes to the big screen at Hollywood’s El Capitan Theatre as a Southern California exclusive during a limited one-week engagement March 11 through March 17.

©2022 Disney. All Rights Reserved.

Guests can attend a “Turning Red” Opening Night Fan Event on March 11 at 7:00pm for $40. Each ticket includes a souvenir credential, reversible bucket cap, notebook and 64oz popcorn tub.

©2022 Disney. All Rights Reserved.

During each show throughout the week, guests are encouraged to arrive early and let loose at the Panda-Monium Dance Party inside the theatre. Audience members can dance and jam to some tunes at their seats with an upbeat, on-stage host while enjoying a fun mix of music.


Showtimes for “Turning Red” March 11 through 14 and March 17 are 10:00am, 1:00pm, 4:00pm, 7:00pm and 9:55pm. Showtimes March 15 and 16 are 10:00am and 1:00pm. Dates and times are subject to change. BFF Packs are also available for $75 each and include four reserved tickets, four 64oz popcorn tubs and one full day of parking at the Hollywood & Highland complex. Additional tickets can be added by calling 1-800-Disney-6 (347-6396). Tickets are now on sale at www.elcapitantickets.com and here. All seats are reserved. Friday through Sunday tickets are $18 for adults and $14 for children and seniors. Monday through Thursday tickets are $16 for adults and $12 for children and seniors. The El Capitan Theatre has taken enhanced health and safety measures for its guests and cast members.  All guests must follow posted instructions while visiting. For health and safety information including theatre policies and procedures visit https://elcapitantheatre.com/safetyinformation/

About Disney and Pixar’s “Turning Red”:Disney and Pixar’s “Turning Red” introduces Mei Lee (voice of Rosalie Chiang), a confident, dorky 13-year-old torn between staying her mother’s dutiful daughter and the chaos of adolescence. Her protective, if not slightly overbearing mother, Ming (voice of Sandra Oh), is never far from her daughter—an unfortunate reality for the teenager. And as if changes to her interests, relationships and body weren’t enough, whenever she gets too excited (which is practically ALWAYS), she “poofs” into a giant red panda! Directed by Academy Award® winner Domee Shi (Pixar short “Bao”) and produced by Lindsey Collins. The screenplay is by Domee Shields and Julia Cho.

Sherry Cola, Tristan Allerick Chen, Ava Morse, Josh Levi, Maitreyi Ramakrishnan, Addie Chandler, Rosalie Chiang, Lily Sanfelippo, Hyein Park, Grayson Villanueva, Sandra Oh, Topher Ngo and Mia Tagano at the premiere screening of TURNING RED. Photo courtesy of Disney+ Facebook

The voice cast includes Ava Morse as Miriam, Mei’s best friend, Maitreyi Ramakrishnan as Priya, Hyein Park as Abby, Mei’s friend, Orion Lee  as Jin Lee, Wai Ching Ho as grandma, Tristan Allerick Chen as Tyler, Addie Chandler as Devon, Mei’s love interest. Jordan Fisher as Robaire, Josh Levi, Topher Ngo, Finneas O’Connell as Jesse, Grayson Villanueva, Anne Marie as Lauren, James Hong, Lori Tan Chinn, Lilian Lim, Mia Tagano, Sherry Cola, Sasha Roiz, and Lilly Sanfellippo round out the cast.

HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME CLASS OF 2022 Includes James Hong, Ming-Na Wen, Black Eyed Peas, Jason Momoa, Carrie Fisher, Salma Hayek, Michael B. Jordan, Regina King, Tessa Thompson, Patti Lupone, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr. and More

James Hong. Photo by Lia Chang
James Hong. Photo by Lia Chang

HOLLYWOOD, CA. June 17, 2021 —A new group of entertainment professionals in the categories of Motion Pictures, Television, Live Theatre/Live Performance, Radio, Recording and the newest category Sports Entertainment have been selected to receive stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame by the Walk of Fame Selection Panel of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. These honorees were chosen from among hundreds of nominations to the committee at a meeting held on June 14, 2021 and ratified by the Hollywood Chamber’s Board of Directors on June 16, 2021.  Ellen K, Chair of the Walk of Fame Selection Panel and Radio personality, announced the new honorees on www.walkoffame.com The Hollywood Walk of Fame Class of 2022 are:

In the category of MOTION PICTURES: Francis Ford Coppola, Macaulay Culkin, Willem Dafoe, Salma Hayek, James Hong, Helen Hunt, Michael B. Jordan, Regina King, Ray Liotta, Ewan McGregor, Adam McKay, Jason Momoa, Tessa Thompson and Carrie Fisher (posthumous).

Last year, Daniel Dae Kim launched a successful fundraiser to nominate James Hong for a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

In the category of TELEVISION: Byron Allen, Greg Berlanti, Ricky Gervais, Peter Krause, Bob Odenkirk, Holly Robinson-Peete, Norman Reedus, Tracee Ellis Ross, Jean Smart, Ming-Na Wen and Kenan Thompson. In the category of RECORDING: Black Eyed Peas, George E. Clinton Jr., Ashanti Douglas, DJ Khaled, Avril Lavigne, Los Huracanes Del Norte, Martha Reeves and Ermias “Nipsey Hussle” Asghedom (posthumous). In the category of LIVE THEATRE/LIVE PERFORMANCE:Patti Lupone, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr. and Angelica Vale In the category of RADIO:  Richard Blade In the category or Sports Entertainment: Michael Strahan

The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce and its Walk of Fame Selection Panel congratulate all the honorees. Dates have not been scheduled for these star ceremonies. Recipients have two years to schedule star ceremonies from the date of selection before they expire. Upcoming star ceremonies are usually announced ten days prior to dedication on the official website www.walkoffame.com

SAG-AFTRA Members Jon Jon Briones, Christina Chang, Juju Chang, Joel De La Fuente, Amy Hill, James Hong, Carrie Ann Inaba, Ken Jeong, Clyde Kusatsu, Jodi Long, Lucy Liu, Tzi Ma, Jeannie Mai, Vincent Rodriguez III, Iqbal Theba and Hudson Yang Take a Stand, Decry Hate Crimes Against Asian Americans in PSA

SAG-AFTRA has released a PSA featuring performers, broadcast journalists and social media influencers calling on all Americans to stand against the stigma, xenophobia and harassment related to COVID-19 that Asian Americans continue to experience. The video was inspired by the sudden spike in hate crimes against Asian Americans during the pandemic.

The full video can be viewed below:

Sixteen SAG-AFTRA members appear in the PSA including Jon Jon Briones, Christina Chang, Juju Chang, Joel De La Fuente, Amy Hill, James Hong, Carrie Ann Inaba, Ken Jeong, Clyde Kusatsu, Jodi Long, Lucy Liu, Tzi Ma, Jeannie Mai, Vincent Rodriguez III, Iqbal Theba and Hudson Yang.

“As a global community, we are experiencing a historically difficult time due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Unfortunately, instead of working together to get through this crisis, a few misguided people are looking for a scapegoat. We are still seeing a shocking increase in hate crimes against Asian Americans, including shunning, racial profiling, verbal harassment and even physical assault. This is a time of high stress, but that is no excuse for discriminatory behavior. We are all Americans and we are all in this together,” said SAG-AFTRA President Gabrielle Carteris.

“SAG-AFTRA is paying attention to those brave Asian American voices coming forward with their heart-wrenching experiences of harassment. We are listening to our members who have a stake in shaping a better world, free of discrimination and harassment, and we applaud Asian American activists, organizations and allies who are bringing attention to this issue. SAG-AFTRA stands with you,” said Ren Hanami, chair of the SAG-AFTRA National Asian Pacific American Media Committee,

“If you experience hateful, criminal behavior or witness it, please report it to your local law enforcement. Let’s stand up for each other,” added Carteris.

The video premiered today during the union’s Race & Storytelling: Asian American Voices livestream panel discussion, which explored the ways in which better representation in the media and three-dimensional portrayals of Asian American Pacific Islander characters can counter stereotypes and result in larger societal impact. You can view the panel discussion below:

The panel was moderated by Jeff Yang, CNN Opinion contributor and cohost of the They Call Us Bruce podcast. Panelists were: Clyde Kusatsu, actor, Dr. Ken; Christina Chang, actor, The Good Doctor; Juju Chang, broadcast journalist, ABC News’ Nightline; Parvesh Cheena, actor, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend; Leslie Woo, casting director, The Farewell; and Hudson Yang, actor, Fresh Off the Boat.

Lia Chang

Lia Chang is an actor, a multi-media content producer and co-founder of Bev’s Girl Films, making films that foster inclusion and diversity on both sides of the camera. Bev’s Girl Films’ debut short film, Hide and Seek was a top ten film in the Asian American Film Lab’s 2015 72 Hour Shootout Filmmaking Competition, and she received a Best Actress nomination. BGF collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers,  musicians and corporations. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman. She stars in and served as Executive Producer for the short independent films Hide and Seek, Balancing Act, Rom-Com Gone Wrong, Belongingness and When the World was Young. She is also the Executive Producer for The Cactus, The Language Lesson, The Writer and Cream and 2 Shugahs. The Lia Chang theater portfolio collection,1989-2011, is in the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) collection located in the Library of Congress’ Asian Reading Room and can be accessed here.

All text, graphics, articles & photographs: © 2000-2020 Lia Chang Multimedia. All rights reserved. All materials contained on this site are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of Lia Chang. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content. For permission, please contact Lia at liachangpr@gmail.com

AAIFF’16: BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA 30th Anniversary Tribute Screening at Flushing Town Hall on July 28

From the set of Big Trouble in Little China. (1986) (c) Twentieth Century Fox.
From the set of Big Trouble in Little China. (1986) (c) Twentieth Century Fox.

On Thursday, July 28th, the American International Film Festival (AAIFF’16) is presenting a free tribute screening of John Carpenter’s 1986 cult classic Big Trouble in Little China,  marking  the 30th anniversary of the release, at Flushing Town Hall, 13735 Northern Blvd, Queens, NY 11354. Showtime: 8:00 PM. The film will be preceded by a 7:00 PM live performance by Eric G. Click here for more information on The Festival.

Kim Cattrall, Kurt Russell, Dennis Dun and Suzee Pai in Big Trouble in Little China (1986) (c) Twentieth Century Fox
Kim Cattrall, Kurt Russell, Dennis Dun and Suzee Pai in Big Trouble in Little China (1986) (c) Twentieth Century Fox

I appeared in the film as a Wing Kong guard and will be attending two screenings this year.

Lia Chang and Donna Noguchi in John Carpenter’s BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA (1986).
Lia Chang and Donna Noguchi in John Carpenter’s BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA (1986).

BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA Cast Reunion featured in BLACK BELT MAGAZINE August/September 2015 

Peter Kwong, Suzee Pai and Kim Cattrall in Big Trouble in Little China. (c) Twentieth Century Fox
Peter Kwong, Suzee Pai and Kim Cattrall in Big Trouble in Little China. (c) Twentieth Century Fox

Big Trouble in Little China featured Kurt Russell as Jack Burton, Kim Cattrall as Gracie Law, Dennis Dun as Wang Chi, James Hong as David Lo Pan, Victor Wong as Egg Shen, Kate Burton as Margo, Donald Li as Eddie Lee, Carter Wong as Thunder, Peter Kwong as Rain, James Pax as Lightning and Suzee Pai as Miao Yin.

James Hong as Lo Pan in Big Trouble in Little China (1986) (c) Twentieth Century Fox
James Hong as Lo Pan in Big Trouble in Little China (1986) (c) Twentieth Century Fox

The action-adventure film stars Kurt Russell as truck driver Jack Burton, who helps his friend Wang Chi (Dennis Dun) rescue Wang’s green-eyed fiancee (Suzee Pai) from bandits in San Francisco’s Chinatown. They go into the mysterious underworld beneath Chinatown, where they face an ancient sorcerer named David Lo Pan (James Hong).

On November 12th, the Urban Action Showcase and Expo (UASE) will continues it’s Diversity in Action initiative of honing the past, present and future multicultural achievements in the genre of Heroes, by celebrating Big Trouble in Little China. Click here for more information.

In addition, there are two books by Tara Bennett and Paul Terry, “The Official Making Of Big Trouble In Little China” (August) and “The Art of Big Trouble In Little China,” (November) and a  “Big Trouble in Little China/Escape From New York” comic book crossover, written by Greg Pak (Totally Awesome HulkAction Comics) with art by Russ Manning Award nominee Daniel Bayliss (October), due out from BOOM!; and many screenings happening around the world for fans to celebrate and commemorate.

BOOM! Studios Commemorates 30th Anniversary of the Release of BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA with the Publication of Two Books, “The Official Making Of Big Trouble In Little China” and “The Art of Big Trouble In Little China”

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Click here for the Lia Chang Articles Archive and here for the Lia Chang Photography Website.

Lia Chang. Photo by Garth Kravits
Lia Chang. Photo by Garth Kravits

Lia Chang is an actor, a multi-media content producer and co-founder of Bev’s Girl Films, making films that foster inclusion and diversity on both sides of the camera. Bev’s Girl Films’ debut short film, Hide and Seek was a top ten film in the Asian American Film Lab’s 2015 72 Hour Shootout Filmmaking Competition, and she received a Best Actress nomination. BGF collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers,  musicians and corporations. Lia is also an internationally published and exhibited photographer, a multi-platform journalist, and a publicist. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman and Hide and Seek. She is profiled in Examiner.comJade Magazine and Playbill.com.

The Academy Class of 2016 includes David Henry Hwang, James Hong, Daniel Dae Kim, Elizabeth Sung, Freida Pinto, Peter Pau, Deepa Mehta, Park Chan-wook, Poon Hang-Sang, Cary Joji Fukunaga, James Wan, Spencer Nakasako, Emiko Omori, Trinh T. Minh-ha, Jean Tsien, Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, Jeff Imada, Mynette Louie and More

ACADEMY INVITES 683 TO MEMBERSHIP

newmembers_2016_landing_51
Posted:
Wednesday, June 29, 2016 – 11:00

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is extending invitations to join the organization to 683 artists and executives who have distinguished themselves by their contributions to theatrical motion pictures.  Those who accept the invitations will be the only additions to the Academy’s membership in 2016.

18 individuals (noted by an asterisk) have been invited to join the Academy by multiple branches.  These individuals must select one branch upon accepting membership.

New members will be welcomed into the Academy at an invitation-only reception in the fall.

Learn more: http://www.oscars.org/2016class

The 2016 invitees are:

Actors
Mahershala Ali – “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay (Parts 1 and 2),” “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
Anthony Anderson – “The Departed,” “Hustle & Flow”
Adam Beach – “Suicide Squad,” “Flags of Our Fathers”
Kate Beckinsale – “Love & Friendship,” “The Aviator”
Chadwick Boseman – “Captain America: Civil War,” “Get on Up”
John Boyega – “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Attack the Block”
Betty Buckley – “Wyatt Earp,” “Carrie”
Rose Byrne – “X-Men: First Class,” “Bridesmaids”
Julie Carmen – “The Milagro Beanfield War,” “Gloria”
Enrique Castillo – “Déjà Vu,” “Bound by Honor”
Morris Chestnut – “G.I. Jane,” “Boyz N the Hood”
Cliff Curtis – “Live Free or Die Hard,” “Training Day”
Loretta Devine – “Crash,” “I Am Sam”
Carmen Ejogo – “Selma,” “Sparkle”
Idris Elba – “Beasts of No Nation,” “Pacific Rim”
America Ferrera – “Cesar Chavez,” “End of Watch”
Vivica A. Fox – “Kill Bill,” “Independence Day”
Andrew Garfield – “99 Homes,” “The Amazing Spider-Man”
Greta Gerwig – “Frances Ha,” “To Rome with Love”
Jesse D. Goins – “The Ugly Truth,” “Patriot Games”
Bruce Greenwood – “Flight,” “Star Trek”
Carla Gugino – “Watchmen,” “Night at the Museum”
Luis Guzmán – “Punch-Drunk Love,” “Carlito’s Way”
Dennis Haysbert – “Dear White People,” “Wreck-It Ralph”
Tom Hiddleston – “Crimson Peak,” “Marvel’s The Avengers”
James Hong – “Safe,” “Mulan”
Oscar Isaac – “Ex Machina,” “A Most Violent Year”
O’Shea “Ice Cube” Jackson* – “Ride Along,” “Friday”
Dakota Johnson – “Black Mass,” “Fifty Shades of Grey”
Cherry Jones – “Whiskey Tango Foxtrot,” “Signs”
Michael B. Jordan – “Creed,” “Fruitvale Station”
Daniel Dae Kim – “The Divergent Series: Insurgent,” “Crash”
Regina King – “Ray,” “Jerry Maguire”
Brie Larson – “Room,” “Trainwreck”
Byung-Hun Lee – “Terminator Genisys,” “G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra”
Nia Long – “Keanu,” “Boyz N the Hood”
Sal Lopez – “The Astronaut Farmer,” “Full Metal Jacket”
Ignacio López Tarso – “Under the Volcano,” “Nazarin”
Patti LuPone – “Parker,” “Driving Miss Daisy”
Peter Mackenzie – “Trumbo,” “42”
Rachel McAdams – “Spotlight,” “Midnight in Paris”
Eva Mendes – “The Place beyond the Pines,” “Hitch”
Tatsuya Nakadai – “Ran,” “Kagemusha”
Adepero Oduye – “The Big Short,” “12 Years a Slave”
Marisa Paredes – “The Skin I Live In,” “All about My Mother”
Nate Parker – “Beyond the Lights,” “Red Tails”
Harold Perrineau – “Zero Dark Thirty,” “28 Weeks Later”
Jorge Perugorría – “Che,” “Strawberry and Chocolate”
Silvia Pinal – “Vintage Model,” “The Exterminating Angel”
Freida Pinto – “Immortals,” “Slumdog Millionaire”
Michelle Rodriguez – “Avatar,” “Girlfight”
Anika Noni Rose – “For Colored Girls,” “Dreamgirls”
Cecilia Roth – “Lucia Lucia,” “All about My Mother”
Mark Rylance – “Bridge of Spies,” “The Other Boleyn Girl”
Pepe Serna – “The Black Dahlia,” “The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez”
Martin Starr – “I’ll See You in My Dreams,” “Adventureland”
Elizabeth Sung – “Memoirs of a Geisha,” “The Joy Luck Club”
Sharmila Tagore – “Dhadkan,” “The World of Apu”
Tessa Thompson – “Creed,” “Dear White People”
Lorraine Toussaint – “Selma,” “Middle of Nowhere”
Glynn Turman – “Super 8,” “Men of Honor”
Gabrielle Union – “Top Five,” “Bad Boys II”
Jacob Vargas – “The 33,” “Jarhead”
Alicia Vikander – “The Danish Girl,” “Ex Machina”
Emma Watson – “The Bling Ring,” “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”
Damon Wayans, Jr. – “Big Hero 6,” “Let’s Be Cops”
Marlon Wayans – “The Heat,” “Requiem for a Dream”
Rita Wilson – “It’s Complicated,” “Runaway Bride”
Daphne Zuniga – “Staying Together,” “Spaceballs”
Casting Directors
Shaheen Baig – “Youth,” “The Impossible”
Sharon Bialy – “Secret in Their Eyes,” “Mr. Holland’s Opus”
Sara Bilbatua – “Pan’s Labyrinth,” “The Devil’s Backbone”
Antoinette Boulat – “Diary of a Chambermaid,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Deirdre Bowen – “Eastern Promises,” “Billy Madison”
Jacqueline Brown – “Akeelah and the Bee,” “Jackie Brown”
Carmen Cuba – “The Martian,” “Side Effects”
Christian Kaplan – “The Book of Life,” “Rio”
Moonyeenn Lee – “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Blood Diamond”
Natalie Lyon – “Inside Out,” “Toy Story 3”
Walter Rippell – “Everybody Has a Plan,” “The Secret in Their Eyes”
Richard Rousseau – “Saint Laurent,” “Renoir”
Kim Taylor-Coleman – “Dope,” “Oldboy”
Manuel Teil – “Babel,” “Y Tu Mamá También”
Cinematographers
Bárbara Alvarez – “The Second Mother,” “Whisky”
C. Mitchell Amundsen – “Ride Along 2,” “Now You See Me”
Adam Arkapaw – “Macbeth,” “McFarland, USA”
Sergio Armstrong – “No,” “The Maid”
Michael Barrett – “Ted 2,” “A Million Ways to Die in the West”
Natasha Braier – “The Rover,” “The Milk of Sorrow”
Lula Carvalho – “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” “RoboCop”
Caroline Champetier – “Holy Motors,” “Of Gods and Men”
Enrique Chediak – “The 5th Wave,” “The Maze Runner”
Charlotte Bruus Christensen – “Far from the Madding Crowd,” “The Hunt”
Sofian El Fani – “Timbuktu,” “Blue Is the Warmest Color”
Mátyás Erdély – “Son of Saul,” “The Quiet Ones”
Frank Griebe – “A Hologram for the King,” “Cloud Atlas”
Kirsten Johnson* – “CitizenFour,” “This Film Is Not Yet Rated”
Judith Kaufmann – “13 Minutes,” “Inbetween Worlds”
Jeanne Lapoirie – “Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem,” “My Little Princess”
Hélène Louvart – “The Wonders,” “Pina”
Félix Monti – “Our Last Tango,” “The Secret in Their Eyes”
Peter Pau – “The Forbidden Kingdom,” “Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon”
Daniel Pearl – “Friday the 13th,” “Aliens vs. Predator – Requiem”
Poon Hang-Sang – “Ip Man 2: Legend of the Grandmaster,” “Kung Fu Hustle”
Gökhan Tiryaki – “Winter Sleep,” “Once upon a Time in Anatolia”
Kim White – “Inside Out,” “Toy Story 3”
Jo Willems – “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay (Parts 1 and 2),” “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire”
Steve Yedlin – “Carrie,” “Looper”
Nelson Yu Lik-Wai – “A Simple Life,” “24 City”
Haris Zambarloukos – “Cinderella,” “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit”
Zhao Fei – “The Sun Also Rises,” “The Curse of the Jade Scorpion”
Costume Designers
Olivier Bériot – “Lucy,” “Taken”
Madeline Fontaine – “The Young and Prodigious T.S. Spivet,” “Yves Saint Laurent”
Pierre-Yves Gayraud – “Albert Nobbs,” “The Bourne Identity”
Sonia Grande – “Magic in the Moonlight,” “Even the Rain”
Suttirat Anne Larlarb – “Steve Jobs,” “127 Hours”
Manon Rasmussen – “Nymphomaniac,” “A Royal Affair”
Designers
Yoshihito Akatsuka – “The Left Ear,” “Warriors of the Rainbow: Seediq Bale”
Kokayi Ampah – “Knight and Day” “Flags of Our Fathers”
Jille Azis – “Magic in the Moonlight,” “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”
Hannah E. Beachler – “Miles Ahead,” “Creed”
Bert Berry – “Inside Out,” “Cars 2”
Celia Bobak – “The Martian,” “Shanghai”
Stephanie Carroll – “Elsa & Fred,” “Monsoon Wedding”
Sue Chan – “Gone Girl,” “300: Rise of an Empire”
Rodolfo Damaggio – “Tomorrowland,” “Terminator Genisys”
Rena DeAngelo – “Bridge of Spies,” “The Judge”
Warren Drummond – “Straight Outta Compton,” “Nightcrawler”
Colin Gibson – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “Happy Feet Two”
Bernhard Henrich – “Bridge of Spies,” “Unfinished Business”
Kalina Ivanov – “Max,” “Little Miss Sunshine”
Michael Anthony Jackson – “Gods of Egypt,” “Fantastic Four”
Philip Keller – “Jurassic World,” “The Last Witch Hunter”
Carolyn A. Loucks – “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice,” “RoboCop”
Chris Lowe – “Spectre,” “Into the Woods”
Ina Mayhew – “Barbershop: The Next Cut,” “Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds”
Alice Normington – “Suffragette,” “Nowhere Boy”
Hamish Purdy – “The Revenant,” “Step Up All In”
Peter Ramsey* – “Penguins of Madagascar,” “Shrek the Third”
Pilar Revuelta – “Exodus: Gods and Kings,” “Pan’s Labyrinth”
Mark Ricker –“Trumbo,” “Get on Up
Dena Roth – “The Wedding Ringer,” “Think Like a Man Too”
David Schlesinger – “True Story,” “Annie”
Richard Sherman – “The Gift,” “Beautiful Creatures”
Michael Standish – “The Danish Girl,” “Victor Frankenstein”
Yohei Taneda – “Monster Hunt,” “The Hateful Eight”
Lisa Thompson – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “San Andreas”
Patrice Vermette – “Sicario,” “The Young Victoria”
Frank Walsh – “The Huntsman: Winter’s War,” “High-Rise”
Directors
Lenny Abrahamson – “Room,” “Frank”
Naji Abu Nowar – “Theeb”
Maren Ade – “Everyone Else,” “The Forest for the Trees”
Lexi Alexander – “Punisher: War Zone,” “Green Street Hooligans”
Haifaa al-Mansour – “Wadjda”
Ana Lily Amirpour – “A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night”
Amma Asante – “Belle,” “A Way of Life”
Katie Aselton – “Black Rock,” “The Freebie”
Ramin Bahrani – “99 Homes,” “At Any Price”
Anna Boden – “Mississippi Grind,” “It’s Kind of a Funny Story”
Catherine Breillat – “The Sleeping Beauty,” “Sex Is Comedy”
Israel Cárdenas – “Sand Dollars,” “Carmita”
Carlos Carrera – “Backyard,” “El Crimen del Padre Amaro”
Nuri Bilge Ceylan – “Winter Sleep,” “Once upon a Time in Anatolia”
Souleymane Cissé – “Brightness,” “The Wind”
Isabel Coixet – “Learning to Drive,” “Elegy”
Ryan Coogler* – “Creed,” “Fruitvale Station”
Scott Cooper – “Black Mass,” “Crazy Heart”
John Crowley – “Brooklyn,” “Closed Circuit”
Julie Dash – “Daughters of the Dust”
Tamra Davis – “Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child,” “Billy Madison”
Jonathan Dayton – “Ruby Sparks,” “Little Miss Sunshine”
Dominique Deruddere – “Flying Home,” “Everybody Famous!”
Xavier Dolan – “Mommy,” “Tom at the Farm”
Cheryl Dunye – “My Baby’s Daddy,” “The Watermelon Woman”
Deniz Gamze Ergüven – “Mustang”
Valerie Faris – “Ruby Sparks,” “Little Miss Sunshine”
Shana Feste – “Endless Love,” “Country Strong”
Hannah Fidell – “A Teacher”
Anne Fletcher – “The Proposal,” “Step Up”
Ari Folman – “The Congress,” “Waltz with Bashir”
Anne Fontaine – “Gemma Bovery,” “Coco before Chanel”
Cary Joji Fukunaga – “Beasts of No Nation,” “Jane Eyre”
Nicole Garcia – “A View of Love,” “Charlie Says”
Juan Antonio Garcia Bayona – “The Impossible,” “The Orphanage”
Sarah Gavron – “Suffragette,” “Brick Lane”
Lesli Linka Glatter – “The Proposition,” “Now and Then”
Ciro Guerra* – “Embrace of the Serpent,” “The Wind Journeys”
Laura Amelia Guzmán – “Sand Dollars,” “Carmita”
Sanaa Hamri – “Just Wright,” “Something New”
Mia Hansen-Løve* – “Eden,” “The Father of My Children”
Mahamet-Saleh Haroun – “Grigris,” “Our Father”
Mary Harron – “The Notorious Bettie Page,” “American Psycho”
Marielle Heller* – “The Diary of a Teenage Girl”
Albert Hughes – “The Book of Eli,” “Dead Presidents”
Hou Hsiao-Hsien – “The Assassin,” “Three Times”
Patty Jenkins – “Wonder Woman,” “Monster”
Naomi Kawase* – “Still the Water,” “The Mourning Forest”
Abdellatif Kechiche – “Blue Is the Warmest Color,” “Black Venus”
Abbas Kiarostami – “Certified Copy,” “Taste of Cherry”
So Yong Kim – “For Ellen,” “In Between Days”
Kiyoshi Kurosawa – “Seventh Code,” “Pulse”
Karyn Kusama – “Jennifer’s Body,” “Girlfight”
Francis H. Lawrence – “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire,” “I Am Legend”
Tobias Lindholm* – “A War,” “A Hijacking”
Phyllida Lloyd – “The Iron Lady,” “Mamma Mia!”
Ken Loach – “The Wind That Shakes the Barley,” “Kes”
Julia Loktev – “The Loneliest Planet,” “Day Night Day Night”
Ami Canaan Mann – “Jackie & Ryan,” “Texas Killing Fields”
Lucrecia Martel – “The Headless Woman,” “The Holy Girl”
Adam McKay* – “The Big Short,” “Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy”
Deepa Mehta – “Midnight’s Children,” “Water”
Ursula Meier – “Sister,” “Home”
Rebecca Miller* – “The Private Lives of Pippa Lee,” “Personal Velocity”
Karen Moncrieff – “The Dead Girl,” “Blue Car”
Cristian Mungiu* – “Graduation,” “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days”
Anna Muylaert – “The Second Mother”
László Nemes* – “Son of Saul”
María Novaro – “The Good Herbs,” “Lola”
Victor Nunez – “Spoken Word,” “Ulee’s Gold”
Euzhan Palcy – “Siméon,” “A Dry White Season”
Park Chan-wook* – “Stoker,” “Oldboy”
Lucía Puenzo – “The German Doctor,” “El Niño Pez”
Lynne Ramsay – “We Need to Talk about Kevin,” “Morvern Callar”
Dee Rees – “Pariah”
Nicolas Winding Refn – “Only God Forgives,” “Drive”
Patricia Riggen – “The 33,” “Girl in Progress”
Gillian Robespierre – “Obvious Child”
Patricia Rozema – “Kit Kittredge: An American Girl,” “Mansfield Park”
Marjane Satrapi – “The Voices,” “Persepolis”
Sam Taylor-Johnson – “Fifty Shades of Grey,” “Nowhere Boy”
George Tillman, Jr. – “Notorious,” “Soul Food”
Luis Valdez – “La Bamba,” “Zoot Suit”
Melvin Van Peebles – “Identity Crisis,” “Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song”
Margarethe von Trotta – “Rosenstrasse,” “Marianne and Juliane”
Lana Wachowski – “Cloud Atlas,” “The Matrix Trilogy”
Lilly Wachowski – “Cloud Atlas,” “The Matrix Trilogy”
Taika Waititi – “Hunt for the Wilderpeople,” “What We Do in the Shadows”
James Wan – “The Conjuring,” “Saw”
Keenan Ivory Wayans* – “Scary Movie,” “A Low Down Dirty Shame”
Apichatpong Weerasethakul – “Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives,” “Tropical Malady”
Documentary
Joslyn Barnes – “The House I Live In,” “Trouble the Water”
Danielle Renfrew Behrens – “Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck,” “The Queen of Versailles”
Joe Bini* – “Tales of the Grim Sleeper,” “Encounters at the End of the World”
Douglas Blush – “The Hunting Ground,” “The Invisible War”
Rachel Boynton – “Big Men,” “Our Brand Is Crisis”
Irene Taylor Brodsky – “The Final Inch,” “Hear and Now”
Margaret Brown – “The Great Invisible,” “The Order of Myths”
Nancy Buirski – “Afternoon of a Faun: Tanaquil Le Clercq,” “The Loving Story”
Maro Chermayeff – “Marina Abramovic The Artist Is Present,” “The Kindness of Strangers”
Ramona S. Diaz – “Don’t Stop Believin’: Everyman’s Journey,” “Imelda”
James Gay-Rees – “Amy,” “Senna”
Haile Gerima – “Teza,” “Ashes and Embers”
Laurens Grant – “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution,” “Freedom Riders”
Richard Hankin – “Art and Craft,” “God Loves Uganda”
Kazuo Hara – “A Dedicated Life,” “The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On”
Thomas Allen Harris – “Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People,” “Twelve
                                       Disciples of Nelson Mandela”
Matthew Heineman – “Cartel Land,” “Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare”
Judith Helfand – “The Barber of Birmingham: Foot Soldier of the Civil Rights Movement,” “Blue Vinyl”
Amy Hobby – “What Happened, Miss Simone?,” “Shepard & Dark”
Kirsten Johnson* – “Cameraperson,” “CitizenFour”
Asif Kapadia – “Amy,” “Senna”
Aviva Kempner – “Rosenwald,” “The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg”
Pedro Kos* – “The Square,” “Waste Land”
Victor Kossakovsky – “Vivan las Antipodas!,” “The Belovs”
Anita Lee – “Stories We Tell,” “Everybody’s Children”
Shola Lynch – “Free Angela and All Political Prisoners,” “Chisholm ’72 – Unbought & Unbossed”
Louis Massiah – “W.E.B. Dubois: A Biography in Four Voices”
Amanda Micheli – “La Corona,” “Double Dare”
Spencer Nakasako – “Refugee,” “A.K.A. Don Bonus”
Emiko Omori – “Rabbit in the Moon,” “Regret to Inform”
Joshua Oppenheimer – “The Look of Silence,” “The Act of Killing”
Dawn Porter – “Trapped,” “Gideon’s Army”
Gini Reticker – “Pray the Devil Back to Hell,” “Asylum”
Azin Samari* – “Ethel,” “The September Issue”
Jessica Sanders – “After Innocence,” “Sing!”
Regina Scully – “The Hunting Ground,” “Alive Inside”
Signe Byrge Sørensen – “The Look of Silence,” “The Act of Killing”
David Teague – “Cutie and the Boxer,” “Freeheld”
Trinh T. Minh-ha – “Forgetting Vietnam,” “Surname Viet Given Name Nam”
Jean Tsien – “Shut Up & Sing,” “Scottsboro: An American Tragedy”
Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi – “Meru,” “Youssou N’Dour: I Bring What I Love”
Wang Bing – “Three Sisters,” “West of the Tracks”
Executives
Pam Abdy
Courtney D. Armstrong
Arturo Barquet
Arianna Bocco
Nicole Brown
Rona Cosgrove
Craig Dehmel
Zanne Devine
Lisa Ellzey
Monique Esclavissat
Pauline Fischer
DeVon Franklin
David W. Greenbaum
Matthew Greenfield
Erica Huggins
Peter Kujawski
Pamela Kunath
Christine Langan
Bonni Lee
James F. Lopez
Xavier Marchand
Anikah Elizabeth McLaren
James Rupert Jacob Murdoch
Lachlan K. Murdoch
Gigi Pritzker
Josh Sapan
Scott Shooman
Adrian Smith
Frank H. Smith
Darren Dennis Throop
Jason D. Young
Film Editors
Niels Pagh Andersen – “The Look of Silence,” “The Act of Killing”
Joe Bini* – “We Need to Talk about Kevin,” “Cave of Forgotten Dreams”
Bettina Böhler – “Phoenix,” “Barbara”
Pernille Bech Christensen – “The Salvation,” “In a Better World”
Raúl Antonio Dávalos – “The Amateurs,” “Meet Wally Sparks”
Marie-Hélène Dozo – “Two Days, One Night,” “L’Enfant”
Amy E. Duddleston – “Elegy,” “Laurel Canyon”
Suzy Elmiger – “Lola Versus,” “Mighty Fine”
Sim Evan-Jones – “Shaun the Sheep Movie,” “Shrek”
Sarah Flack – “Away We Go,” “Lost in Translation”
Affonso Gonçalves – “Carol,” “Winter’s Bone”
Matthew Hamachek – “Cartel Land,” “If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front”
Chris King – “Amy,” “Exit through the Gift Shop”
Pedro Kos* – “The Square,” “Waste Land”
Sylvie Landra – “Catwoman,” “The Fifth Element”
Tom McArdle – “Spotlight,” “The Station Agent”
Adam Nielsen – “A War,” “A Hijacking”
Kevin Nolting – “Inside Out,” “Up”
Nathan Nugent – “Room,” “Frank”
Stan Salfas – “Morning,” “Let Me In”
Azin Samari* – “Ethel,” “The September Issue”
Margaret Sixel – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “Happy Feet”
Mary Stephen – “Blind Mountain,” “A Tale of Winter”
Troy Takaki – “Baggage Claim,” “The Bounty Hunter”
Camilla Toniolo – “His Way,” “Company Man”
Bernat Vilaplana – “Crimson Peak,” “Pan’s Labyrinth”
Pax Wassermann – “Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me,” “Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer”
Julia Wong – “Hercules,” “Extract”
Mark Yoshikawa – “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay (Parts 1 and 2),” “The Tree of Life”
Makeup Artists and Hairstylists
Karen Asano-Myers – “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “42”
Pierce Austin – “Concussion,” “After Earth”
Julie Dartnell – “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” “Les Misérables”
Beatrice De Alba – “Away We Go,” “Frida”
Dave Elsey – “Mr. Holmes,” “The Wolfman”
Camille Friend – “The Hateful Eight,” “Django Unchained”
Anita Gibson – “Beyond the Lights,” “Top Five”
Giorgio Gregorini – “The Impossible,” “Apocalypto”
Siân Grigg – “The Revenant,” “Ex Machina”
Norma Hill-Patton – “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” “The Company You Keep”
Duncan Jarman – “The Revenant,” “Rush”
Love Larson – “The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared,” “The Girl Who Played with
                          Fire”
Angela Levin – “Cake,” “Horrible Bosses”
Ivana Primorac – “Anna Karenina,” “The Reader”
Beverly Jo Pryor – “Straight Outta Compton,” “Selma”
Jan Sewell – “The Danish Girl,” “The Theory of Everything”
Maurizio Silvi – “The Great Gatsby,” “Moulin Rouge”
Heba Thorisdottir – “The Hateful Eight,” “Bridesmaids”
Lesley Vanderwalt – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “The Great Gatsby”
Eva von Bahr – “The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared,” “The Girl with the Dragon
                           Tattoo”
Music
Lesley Barber – “The Moth Diaries,” “Los Locos”
Wendy Blackstone – “Whitey: United States of America v. James J. Bulger,” “To Be Heard”
Mary J. Blige – “The Help,” “Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire”
Kathryn Bostic – “Dear White People,” “The New Black”
Carl Davis – “The Understudy,” “Scandal”
Joseph S. DeBeasi – “The Revenant,” “Sicario”
Joanie Diener – “Merchants of Doubt,” “The Skulls”
Fitzgerald Diggs (RZA) – “Django Unchained,” “The Man with the Iron Fists”
Germaine Franco – “Dope,” “Mr. and Mrs. Smith”
Sia Furler – “Zootopia,” “Fifty Shades of Grey”
Peter Golub – “Audrey,” “Countdown to Zero”
Amanda Goodpaster – “Pitch Perfect 2,” “Diary of a Wimpy Kid”
Tanya Noel Hill – “Ant-Man,” “Chef”
Deborah Lurie – “Safe Haven,” “Dear John”
Heather McIntosh – “Z for Zachariah,” “Honeymoon”
Marcus Miller – “About Last Night,” “Deliver Us from Eva”
Antonio Pinto – “Amy,” “Senna”
Raphael Saadiq – “Epic,” “Love and Basketball”
Jim Schultz – “Black Mass,” “Inglourious Basterds”
Del Spiva – “Fury,” “Prometheus”
Taura Stinson – “Rio 2,” “Black Nativity”
Joseph Trapanese – “Straight Outta Compton,” “Nightcrawler”
Shigeru Umebayashi – “The Grandmaster,” “2046”
Fernando Velázquez – “Crimson Peak,” “Mama”
Will.i.am – “The Great Gatsby,” “Rio”
Marcelo Zarvos – “Rock the Kasbah,” “The Beaver”
Producers
Belén Atienza – “Out of the Dark,” “The Impossible”
Amy Baer – “A Storm in the Stars,” “Last Vegas”
David Barron – “Cinderella,” “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Parts 1 and 2)
Ram Bergman – “Don Jon,” “Looper”
Virginie Besson-Silla – “Lucy,” “The Lady”
Fernando Bovaira – “Biutiful,” “The Sea Inside”
Anne Carey – “Mr. Holmes,” “The Savages”
Debra Martin Chase – “Sparkle,” “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants”
Bonnie Curtis – “Albert Nobbs,” “Minority Report”
Susan Downey – “The Judge,” “Sherlock Holmes”
Ed Guiney – “Room,” “Frank”
Paul E. Hall – “Peeples,” “For Colored Girls”
Rachael Horovitz – “Maggie’s Plan,” “Moneyball”
Mark Huffam – “The Martian,” “Exodus: Gods and Kings”
Elizabeth Karlsen – “Carol,” “Made in Dagenham”
Gail Katz – “Pawn Sacrifice,” “The Perfect Storm”
Amy Kaufman – “Beasts of No Nation, “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints”
Neil Kopp – “Green Room,” “Wendy and Lucy”
Kristie Macosko Krieger – “Bridge of Spies,” “Lincoln”
David Lancaster – “Eye in the Sky,” “Whiplash”
Albert Lee – “Chinese Zodiac,” “Let the Bullets Fly”
Roy Lee – “The Lego Movie,” “Abduction”
Mynette Louie – “Land Ho!,” “Cold Comes the Night”
Daniela Taplin Lundberg – “Beasts of No Nation,” “The Kids Are All Right”
Lori McCreary – “The Magic of Belle Isle,” “Invictus”
Edward L. McDonnell – “Sicario,” “Insomnia”
Jamie Patricof – “Mississippi Grind,” “Blue Valentine”
Amanda Posey – “Brooklyn,” “An Education”
Heather Rae – “The Dry Land,” “Frozen River”
Alexander Rodnyansky – “Leviathan,” “Stalingrad”
Esther García Rodríguez – “Wild Tales,” “The Skin I Live In”
Anish Savjani – “Green Room,” “Meek’s Cutoff”
Allison Shearmur – “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies,” “Cinderella”
Michael Sugar – “Spotlight,” “The Fifth Estate”
Robert Teitel – “Barbershop: The Next Cut,” “Men of Honor”
Rodrigo Teixeira – “The Witch,” “Mistress America”
Nina Yang Bongiovi – “Dope,” “Fruitvale Station”
Public Relations
Michael S. Agulnek
Marina Bailey
Jacqueline L. Bazan
Stephen D. Bruno
Cassandra O. Butcher
Zachary Eller
Linda Guerrero
Barry Dale Johnson
Kate Lee
Amy Mastriona
R.J. Millard
Kelly Bush Novak
Fumiko Kitahara Otto
Jack Pan
Terra Potts
Arnold Robinson
David Stern
Lisa Taback
Jean-Pierre Vincent
David S. Waldman
Ryan Werner
Katherine Willing
Short Films and Feature Animation
Alê Abreu – “Boy and the World,” “Cosmic Boy”
Line K. Andersen – “The Croods,” “Monsters vs Aliens”
Bruce Anderson – “Rio 2,” “Rio”
Graham Annable – “The Boxtrolls,” “ParaNorman”
Guillaume Aretos – “Puss in Boots,” “Shrek the Third”
Serena Armitage – “Stutterer,” “Scorned”
Sanjay Bakshi – “The Good Dinosaur,” “Monsters University”
Maxwell Boas – “Kung Fu Panda 3,” “Rise of the Guardians”
Lydia Bottegoni – “Hotel Transylvania,” “Surf’s Up”
Rebecca Wilson Bresee – “Zootopia,” “Frozen”
Mark Burton – “Shaun the Sheep Movie,” “Gnomeo & Juliet”
Chris Butler – “ParaNorman,” “Coraline”
Clément Calvet – “Cafard,” “Song of the Sea”
Tom Cardone – “Rio 2,” “Dr. Seuss’ Horton Hears a Who!”
Marci Carlin – “The Soul of Nashville,” “Human Destiny”
Galen Tan Chu – “Epic,” “Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs”
Benjamin Cleary – “Love Is a Sting,” “Stutterer”
Pam Coats – “Gnomeo & Juliet,” “Mulan”
Melissa Beth Cobb – “Kung Fu Panda 3,” “Kung Fu Panda 2”
Deborah Cook – “The Boxtrolls,” “ParaNorman”
Jamie Oliver Donoughue – “Shok,” “Life on the Line”
Renato Dos Anjos – “Wreck-It Ralph,” “Bolt”
Jeff Draheim – “Frozen,” “The Princess and the Frog”
Karen Dufilho – “Duet,” “For the Birds”
Pato Escala – “Bear Story”
Katie Fico – “Zootopia,” “Feast”
Michael Fong – “Inside Out,” “Toy Story 3”
Lori Forte – “Epic,” “Ice Age Continental Drift”
Oorlagh George – “The Shore”
Jonathan Gibbs – “Turbo,” “The Croods”
Steven Goldberg – “Frozen,” “Tangled”
Judith Gruber-Stitzer – “Wild Life,” “When the Day Breaks”
Jorge R. Gutierrez – “The Book of Life,” “Carmelo”
Jane Hartwell – “The Croods,” “Madagascar”
Georgina Hayns – “The Boxtrolls,” “ParaNorman”
Janet Healy – “Minions,” “Despicable Me 2”
Tang K. Heng – “Kung Fu Panda 2,” “Kung Fu Panda”
Jon W.S. Huertas – “The Box,” “Lone”
Raman Hui – “Monster Hunt,” “Shrek the Third”
Claire Jennings – “Coraline,” “Father and Daughter”
Yong Duk Jhun – “The Croods,” “Shrek Forever After”
Sahim Omar Kalifa – “Bad Hunter,” “Baghdad Messi”
Scott Kersavage – “Zootopia,” “Wreck-It Ralph”
Basil Khalil – “Ave Maria,” “Shooter”
Michael Knapp – “Epic,” “Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs”
Robert Kondo – “The Dam Keeper,” “La Luna”
Shawn Krause – “Inside Out,” “Cars 2”
Max Lang – “Room on the Broom,” “The Gruffalo”
Nicolas Marlet – “Kung Fu Panda 3,” “How to Train Your Dragon 2”
Steve Martino – “The Peanuts Movie,” “Ice Age Continental Drift”
Dale Mayeda – “Planes: Fire & Rescue,” “Frozen”
Brian McLean – “The Boxtrolls,” “ParaNorman”
Mike Mitchell – “Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked,” “Shrek Forever After”
Joe Moshier – “Penguins of Madagascar,” “How to Train Your Dragon 2”
James Ford Murphy – “Lava,” “Cars”
Kiel Murray – “Up,” “Cars”
Yoshiaki Nishimura – “When Marnie Was There,” “The Tale of the Princess Kaguya”
Kyle Odermatt – “Big Hero 6,” “Paperman”
Linda Campos Olszewski – “Car-Ma’,” “A Bad Hair Day”
Gabriel Osorio – “Bear Story,” “Residuos”
Sanjay Patel – “Sanjay’s Super Team,” “Tokyo Mater”
Martin Pope – “Room on the Broom,” “Chico & Rita”
Christian Potalivo – “The New Tenants,” “The Pig”
Tina Price – “Dinosaur,” “Fantasia/2000”
Peter Ramsey* – “Rise of the Guardians,” “Monsters vs Aliens”
Denise Ream – “The Good Dinosaur,” “Cars 2”
Julie Roy – “Carface,” “Kali the Little Vampire”
Damon Russell – “Curfew,” “Brink”
William Salazar – “Kung Fu Panda 3,” “Monsters vs Aliens”
Scott Santoro – “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2,” “Flushed Away”
Katherine Sarafian – “Brave,” “Lifted”
Kent Seki – “Rocky and Bullwinkle,” “Megamind”
Osnat Shurer – “One Man Band,” “Boundin’”
Mireille Soria – “Home,” “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted”
Richard Starzak – “Shaun the Sheep Movie,” “A Matter of Loaf and Death”
Michael D. Surrey – “The Princess and the Frog,” “The Lion King”
Galyn Susman – “Ratatouille,” “Toy Story 2”
Imogen Sutton – “Prologue,” “The Thief and the Cobbler”
Dice Tsutsumi – “The Dam Keeper,” “Monsters University”
Nora Twomey – “Song of the Sea,” “The Secret of Kells”
Pablo Valle – “How to Train Your Dragon 2,” “Turbo”
Michael Venturini – “The Good Dinosaur,” “Toy Story 3”
Pierre-Olivier Vincent – “How to Train Your Dragon 2,” “How to Train Your Dragon”
Patrick Vollrath – “Everything Will Be Okay (Alles Wird Gut),” “The Jacket (Die Jacke)”
Dan Wagner – “Kung Fu Panda 3,” “Kung Fu Panda 2”
Koji Yamamura – “Muybridge’s Strings,” “Mt. Head”
Hiromasa Yonebayashi – “When Marnie Was There,” “The Secret World of Arrietty”
Raymond Zibach – “Kung Fu Panda 3,” “Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas”
Sound
Pud Cusack – “Free State of Jones,” “The Mask of Zorro”
Susan Dawes – “Deadpool,” “Wild”
Chris Duesterdiek – “The Revenant,” “Elysium”
Tammy Fearing – “Trainwreck,” “Bridesmaids”
Roberto Fernandez – “St. Vincent,” “Drive”
Eric Flickinger – “The Big Short,” “World War Z”
Gabriel Gutiérrez – “Automata,” “Mama”
Matthew Harrison – “Paper Towns,” “The Maze Runner”
Nina Hartstone – “The Book Thief,” “Gravity”
Michael Hertlein – “The Hateful Eight,” “American Hustle”
Paul Hsu – “Spotlight,” “Salt”
George Lara – “Chi-Raq,” “Spotlight”
Anna MacKenzie – “Spectre,” “Prometheus”
John G. Marquis – “Godzilla,” “Beautiful Creatures”
James Harley Mather – “Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation,” “Sherlock Holmes”
Chuck Michael – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “X-Men: Days of Future Past”
Timothy Karl Nielsen – “Racing Extinction,” “War Horse”
Eric Norris – “Unbroken,” “Man of Steel”
Ben Osmo – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “Happy Feet Two”
Eliza Paley – “Miles Ahead,” “Carol”
Glenfield Payne – “Beasts of No Nation,” “Blue Jasmine”
Michele Perrone – “The Revenant,” “Straight Outta Compton”
Lisa Pinero – “Steve Jobs,” “Fury”
Mac Ruth – “The Martian,” “World War Z”
Christopher Scarabosio – “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Paul P. Soucek – “Fright Night,” “Michael Clayton”
Nancy Nugent Title – “Spy,” “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes”
Richard Toenes – “Iron Man 3,” “Warrior”
Todd Toon – “The Revenant,” “The Princess and the Frog”
Bernard Weiser – “American Hustle,” “The Hurt Locker”
David White – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “The Railway Man”
Byron Wilson – “Black Mass,” “True Grit”
Matthew R. Wood – “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “WALL-E”
Tamás Zányi – “Son of Saul,” “Delta”
Visual Effects
Kevin Baillie – “The Walk,” “Transformers: Age of Extinction”
Sara Bennett – “Ex Machina,” “Hercules”
Theo Bialek – “The Amazing Spider-Man 2,” “The Smurfs 2”
Richard Bluff – “The Big Short,” “Unbroken”
Steve Cremin – “Hail, Caesar!,” “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay (Parts 1 and 2)”
Lindy Wilson De Quattro – “Pacific Rim,” “Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol”
Adrian de Wet – “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay (Parts 1 and 2),” “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire”
Matt Dessero – “Jupiter Ascending,” “Divergent”
Deak Ferrand – “By the Sea,” “Lucy”
Ronald Frankel – “Gods of Egypt,” “Riddick”
John Gibson – “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” “Snow White and the Huntsman”
Martin Hill – “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2,” “Furious Seven”
Bruce L. Holcomb – “Ant-Man,” “Avengers: Age of Ultron”
Andrew Jackson – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies”
Matthew Jacobs – “Gods of Egypt,” “Deliver Us from Evil”
Anders Langlands – “The Martian,” “X-Men: Days of Future Past”
Seth Maury – “Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb,” “Maleficent”
Rich McBride – “The Revenant,” “Gravity”
Kelvin McIlwain – “Furious Seven,” “Snow White and the Huntsman”
Paul Norris – “Ex Machina,” “Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation”
Dan Oliver – “Gods of Egypt,” “Mad Max: Fury Road”
Edward M. Pasquarello – “Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension,” “Tomorrowland”
Betsy Paterson – “The Hunger Games,” “The Incredible Hulk”
Matthew Shumway – “The Revenant,” “Life of Pi”
Jason Smith – “The Revenant,” “Super 8”
Kevin Andrew Smith – “Hunt for the Wilderpeople,” “Krampus”
Simone Kraus Townsend – “Ant-Man,” “Avengers: Age of Ultron”
Stefano Trivelli – “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Pan”
Adam Valdez – “Maleficent,” “World War Z”
David Vickery – “Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation,” “Fast & Furious 6”
Steven Warner – “The Brothers Grimsby,” “The Martian”
Andrew Whitehurst – “Ex Machina,” “Paddington”
Andy Williams – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “Fury”
Tom Wood – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “The Last Witch Hunter”
Writers 
Jonathan Aibel – “Kung Fu Panda” series, “Monsters vs Aliens”
Sherman Alexie – “The Business of Fancydancing,” “Smoke Signals”
Glenn Berger – “Kung Fu Panda” series, “Monsters vs Aliens”
Andrea Berloff – “Straight Outta Compton,” “World Trade Center”
Vera Blasi – “Tortilla Soup,” “Woman on Top”
Ryan Coogler* – “Creed,” “Fruitvale Station”
Destin Daniel Cretton – “Short Term 12,” “I Am Not a Hipster”
Emma Donoghue – “Room”
Tina Fey – “Mean Girls”
Efthimis Filippou – “The Lobster,” “Dogtooth”
Jennifer Flackett-Levin – “Little Manhattan,” “Wimbledon”
Ryan Fleck – “Mississippi Grind,” “Half Nelson”
Alex Garland – “Ex Machina,” “28 Days Later”
Drew Goddard – “The Martian,” “Cloverfield”
Ciro Guerra* – “Embrace of the Serpent,” “The Wind Journeys”
Mia Hansen-Løve* – “Eden,” “The Father of My Children”
Marielle Heller* – “The Diary of a Teenage Girl”
David Henry Hwang – “Possession,” “Golden Gate”
O’Shea “Ice Cube” Jackson* – “The Players Club,” “Friday”
Jia Zhangke – “Mountains May Depart,” “Still Life”
Miranda July – “The Future,” “Me and You and Everyone We Know”
Laeta Kalogridis – “Terminator Genisys,” “Shutter Island”
Naomi Kawase* – “Still the Water,” “Firefly”
Richard Kelly – “Domino,” “Donnie Darko”
Takeshi Kitano – “Outrage,” “Kikujiro”
Hirokazu Koreeda – “Like Father, Like Son,” “Nobody Knows”
Yorgos Lanthimos – “The Lobster,” “Dogtooth”
Lee Chang-dong – “Poetry,” “Oasis”
Sebastián Lelio – “Gloria,” “Navidad”
Mark Levin – “Journey to the Center of the Earth,” “Nim’s Island”
Tobias Lindholm* – “A War,” “The Hunt”
Adam McKay* – “The Big Short,” “The Other Guys”
Rebecca Miller* – “Maggie’s Plan,” “The Ballad of Jack and Rose”
Abi Morgan – “Suffragette,” “The Iron Lady”
Cristian Mungiu* – “Beyond the Hills,” “Occident”
Phyllis Nagy – “Carol”
László Nemes* – “Son of Saul”
Park Chan-wook* – “Thirst,” “Oldboy”
Charles Randolph – “The Big Short,” “The Life of David Gale”
Carlos Reygadas – “Silent Light,” “Battle in Heaven”
Clara Royer – “Son of Saul”
Misan Sagay – “Belle,” “The Secret Laughter of Women”
Lorene Scafaria – “The Meddler,” “Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist”
Josh Singer – “Spotlight,” “The Fifth Estate”
Keenan Ivory Wayans* – “White Chicks,” “A Low Down Dirty Shame”
Alice Winocour – “Mustang,” “Home”
Members-at-Large
Tina Anderson
M. James Arnett
Dana Belcastro
Schawn Belston
Katherine Beyda
Lynwen Brennan
Camille Cellucci
Annie Chang
Yolanda T. Cochran
Gary Combs
Jenny Fulle
Theodore E. Gluck
Hal H. Haenel
Ramzi Haidamus
Eunice Huthart
Jeff Imada
Stephanie A. Ito
Mike Knobloch
Ravi D. Mehta
Sunny Park
Manny Perry
Ana Maria Quintana
Nancy St. John
Philip Steuer
Keith Woulard
Susan Zwerman
Associates
Adriana Alberghetti
Michelle Bohan
David Bugliari
John Campisi
Esther Chang
Maha Dakhil
David DeCamillo
Jerome Duboz
Helen du Toit
Jeff Gorin
Julie Huntsinger
Tracey R. Jacobs
Adam J. Kanter
Craig Kestel
Franklin Leonard
Betsy A. McLane
Cameron Mitchell
Andrea Nelson Meigs
Emanuel Nunez
Joanelle Romero
Rena Ronson
Lara Sackett
Carin Sage
Phillip Sun
Joanne Roberts Wiles
Warren Zavala

Click here for the Lia Chang Articles Archive and here for the Lia Chang Photography Website.

Lia Chang. Photo by Garth Kravits
Lia Chang. Photo by Garth Kravits

Lia Chang is an actor, a multi-media content producer and co-founder of Bev’s Girl Films, making films that foster inclusion and diversity on both sides of the camera. Bev’s Girl Films’ debut short film, Hide and Seek was a top ten film in the Asian American Film Lab’s 2015 72 Hour Shootout Filmmaking Competition, and she received a Best Actress nomination. BGF collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers,  musicians and corporations. Lia is also an internationally published and exhibited photographer, a multi-platform journalist, and a publicist. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman and Hide and Seek. She is profiled in Examiner.comJade Magazine and Playbill.com.

EW.com: See exclusive behind-the-scenes photos from The Official Making of Big Trouble in Little China

Photo: Drew Struzan
Photo: Drew Struzan

When it was released three decades ago, John Carpenter’s modern Western-cum-martial arts epic Big Trouble in Little China was greeted by a tepid reception at the box office and often negative reviews (Roger Ebert began his assessment of the film with the words “It seems like a great idea” and then concluded it was not). But, like Carpenter’s 1982 horror film The Thing, this tale of a befuddled truck driver (Kurt Russell), his much more competent partner (Dennis Dun) and the monster-filled fantasia they encounter beneath the streets of San Francisco has been positively reassessed over time and is now regarded as a cult classic.

This August, BOOM! Studios is marking the 30th anniversary of the movie by publishing The Official Making of Big Trouble in Little China, which includes hundreds of never-before-seen photos and exclusive interviews with cast and crew members.

Click here to read the interview with authors Tara Bennett and Paul Terry, who talk about their book and their love for Carpenter’s weird, wonderful creation.

Video: HIDE AND SEEK Starring Lia Chang and Garth Kravits to Screen in 2016 Katra Film Series in New York on May 14; Complete Lineup
BLACK SALT Premiere and UASE Diversity in Action Panel Discussion featuring Warrington Hudlin, Lia Chang, Taimak, Kinyumba Mutakabbir, Mike Hodge, Kelly Edwards, Bobby Samuels and Vincent Lyn
Up Close and Personal with Actor Peter Kwong 
Photos: Inside HorrorHound and Son of Monsterpalooza with ‘Big Trouble in Little China’ stars Peter Kwong, James Hong and James Pax 
Photos: Traveling through the mouth of the Dragon with BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA’s James Hong, Peter Kwong, Lia Chang, Gerald Okamura, George Cheung, Al Leong, Jeff Imada, James Lew, Gary Goldman, Eric Lee ‪
lookitseugeneabano.wordpress.com: Big Trouble in Little China Revisited- Picture Heavy
Funko to Release Big Trouble in Little China Pop! and ReAction Figures

Click here for the Lia Chang Articles Archive and here for the Lia Chang Photography Website.

Lia Chang. Photo by Garth Kravits
Lia Chang. Photo by Garth Kravits

Lia Chang is an actor, a multi-media content producer and co-founder of Bev’s Girl Films, making films that foster inclusion and diversity on both sides of the camera. Bev’s Girl Films’ debut short film, Hide and Seek was a top ten film in the Asian American Film Lab’s 2015 72 Hour Shootout Filmmaking Competition, and she received a Best Actress nomination. BGF collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers, musicians and corporations. Lia is also an internationally published and exhibited photographer, a multi-platform journalist, and a publicist. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman and Hide and Seek. She is profiled in Examiner.comJade Magazine and Playbill.com.